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Recently been desoldering a lot of parts and was wondering if Sill Gasket is at all similar and sufficient as anti-static foam for storing ICs. http://insulation.owenscorning.ca/builders/products/foamsealr.aspx Currently working in construction and this stuff is abundant so it is way easier and cheaper to get hold of.

My other option is to buy WAY more than I need from ULINE http://www.uline.ca/BL_8001/Uline-Anti-Static-Foam-Rolls

Both say they are polyethylene foam. This might answer my question but confirmation would be nice since I have not found anyone else on the internet doing this prior. I hope this can provide reference for others who might be thinking of doing the same.

Thanks in advance :)

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    \$\begingroup\$ The composition is more important than the color. Also, anti-static is not the same as static-dissipative. \$\endgroup\$ – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 23 '16 at 1:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ Almost certainly not. That stuff is pink because it's an Owens-Corning trademark, not because of any ESD properties. There's no reason for them to make it static-dissipative for its normal uses, so they won't. \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon May 23 '16 at 2:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, that is why I also made the point that they say they are both polyethylene. The similar colour only caught my attention and got me thinking about it. I doubt pink is a critical colour to the real stuff either. Since I have this stuff on hand, how can I go about testing it's anti-static properties, if it has any? \$\endgroup\$ – Benargee May 23 '16 at 2:22
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Benargee - Measure it's resistance. Anti-static foam should have a measurable resistance. Not so certain about static dissipative. \$\endgroup\$ – Connor Wolf May 23 '16 at 3:26
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Measure its resistivity. Use your DMM with 10 Megohm input impedance. Set the DMM to the 20 Vdc range and connect the meter in series with a 9V battery and with a pair of probes stuck into the foam.

If necessary, switch the DMM to the 2V or 200mV range.

If you do NOT see any voltage on the DMM, the foam isn't suitable to be used as static dissipative material.

Note that you are using the DMM as a very sensitive current meter when connected in this fashion.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for the constructive answer on how to actually validate its anti static properties. I will try this asap and return with my findings. \$\endgroup\$ – Benargee May 24 '16 at 2:11
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No. Just because it is pink has nothing to do with conductive properties (conductive, static-dissipative, etc.).

You must ask yourself whether your investment in components is worth protecting by using proper storage techniques. Were the components not delivered in static-protective packaging. At the least you could leave the components in the original shipping materials until use.

At minimum you could use ordinary foam covered with aluminum foil. It is no proper substitute for genuine static-dissipative foam or containers, but it is slightly better than nothing.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I never said that it being pink is why I thought it was the same stuff or had the same properties. I clearly pointed out that they are of the same material, polyethylene. The only relevance to colour is that it got me thinking about it in the first place. Please actually read my whole question. \$\endgroup\$ – Benargee May 24 '16 at 2:09
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Note that even if that foam from Uline were available in more affordable/reasonable sizes and packaging, it is not necessarily the kind of foam typically used for IC storage. We traditionally use the black, carbonized kind of foam for sticking IC pins into. That kind of foam is available from many Ebay vendors in a variety of sizes.

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