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I've been wondering about this for a while; I have a Wireless 2.4GHz keyboard that requires a USB reciever to catch the signal.

How great would it be though if I could use it on my phone, for example, without having to plug a usb in my phone, but rather connect it through bluetooth?

That's pretty much what I'm curious about. Could somebody enlighten me on this?

Thanks.

EDIT

My question is pretty much, is it possible to convert wireless 2.4ghz into bluetooth?

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closed as off-topic by Scott Seidman, uint128_t, PeterJ, Asmyldof, Daniel Grillo May 30 '16 at 11:27

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions on the use of electronic devices are off-topic as this site is intended specifically for questions on electronics design." – Scott Seidman, uint128_t, PeterJ, Asmyldof, Daniel Grillo
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ Do you have a question? To answer your only asked question, it would be slightly cooler than using a Bluetooth keyboard. \$\endgroup\$ – Scott Seidman May 29 '16 at 15:44
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No, you can't.

Just because two things run on the same frequency does not make them compatible. Bluetooth and Wi-Fi both run on 2.4GHz, but you can't connect a Bluetooth device to a Wi-Fi network because the speak different protocols. A microwave oven also runs at 2.4GHz, you can't connect that to your network either.

Your keyboard likely uses some proprietary communication protocol, which will be in no way compatible with Bluetooth.

The only way to convert the keyboard to Bluetooth would be to take it apart, remove whatever transceiver it uses (or somehow disable the circuitry if it is not a separate module). Then you would have to find a suitable Bluetooth transceiver which supports presenting itself as a keyboard, and then somehow connect it in to a keyboard circuitry which is probably completely undocumented with no information available as to how the circuit talks to the transceiver.

It is simply not worth trying to do. Go buy an actual Bluetooth keyboard as it's probably cheaper than finding the right sort of Bluetooth transceiver module, and definitely much easier.

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While your keyboard operates on the same 2.4GHz ISM band as BlueTooth, the communication PROTOCOL is completely different. This protocol is "baked in" to the firmware in the integrated circuits. It is way beyond the capability of any individual to re-write the firmware code and install it into the chip. You could buy a million new BlueTooth keyboards for what it would cost to do the "conversion".

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