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Following is a power supply with dual +-15V output:

http://docs-europe.electrocomponents.com/webdocs/13f8/0900766b813f8a87.pdf

I'm confused to understand two points:

1-) What is the difference between Output A and Output C ? Both looks variable. One is 1A the other is 0.2 A. I cannot figure out what is the difference. For dual op-Amps which one should be used?

2-) It also says 0 to 30V. How can it be configured for that? Output A with +15 plus and -15 GND?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Some of the statements on that brochure don't make sense to me. I'd want to look at a proper user manual or schematic diagram to determine what voltages are really available under what circumstances. \$\endgroup\$ Jun 6, 2016 at 20:12

2 Answers 2

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enter image description here

1-) What is the difference between Output A and Output C ? Both looks variable. One is 1A the other is 0.2 A. I cannot figure out what is the difference. For dual op-Amps which one should be used?

OUTPUT A is a pair of tracking outputs. Press the OUTPUT SELECTION button and the OUTPUT A LED will probably blink (I didn't check). Pressing the up/down keys will cause both to be adjusted. e.g., ±15, ±14, ±13, etc., or in 0.1 V steps. Use these for dual rail opamps.

OUTPUT C is a second single supply adjustable independently between -15 and +15 V. This could be useful, for example, to apply a DC voltage into your opamp circuit.

2-) It also says 0 to 30V. How can it be configured for that? Output A with +15 plus and -15 GND?

enter image description here

You're right - it can't. It's 30 V between the blue and the red socket but that will only be useful if you don't need the COM reference. It will be symmetrical around the COM terminal.

enter image description here

Wow!

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I want to buy a cheap power supply with variable outputs and +-15V split supply option. This is the only one I could find in RS. Would you recommend it for hobby projects? \$\endgroup\$
    – user16307
    Jun 6, 2016 at 20:15
  • \$\begingroup\$ It depends on your requirements. You've already identified one limitation. I would be inclined to get a single adjustable supply and a fixed ±12 or ±15 V supply for the opamps. You generally don't need much current for these but the big adjustable can be used to charge batteries, etc. \$\endgroup\$
    – Transistor
    Jun 6, 2016 at 20:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ I don't want to have two supplies and I dont want to waste time for creating split supplies each time. The two output ones are easy to make split but they are expensive. What could limit me if I use this one? \$\endgroup\$
    – user16307
    Jun 6, 2016 at 20:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ This doesnt have current limiting. Is that a big problem? \$\endgroup\$
    – user16307
    Jun 6, 2016 at 20:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ The lack of current limiting is a problem. It's a very useful feature when powering up a circuit, device or motor that may have a fault. It reduces the possibility of damage. The other problem is the lack of flexibility because the COMs are all internally connected. \$\endgroup\$
    – Transistor
    Jun 6, 2016 at 20:25
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output A: you can select any two voltages (blue, red) in the range of -15V to +15V, that is 0v to -15v is obtained from the blue colored terminal , 0v to +15v is obtained from the red colored terminal.

output C: it is a single output terminal through which we can obtain only one voltage in -15v to +15v interval

for op-amps we use output A.

if -15v is considered as the reference voltage, output A behaves as 0 to 30v variable power supply.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ When would you use Output C? Lets say you need +9V, Which output would you choose? Why? \$\endgroup\$
    – user16307
    Jun 6, 2016 at 20:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ It depends on the current. We usually choose low currents and so using output C is better. \$\endgroup\$
    – user113205
    Jun 6, 2016 at 20:53

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