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My dad took my battery for misbehaving (No questions!) but I still want to use my phone (Huawei Honor 3c). However, when I use a USB plug, the phone only vibrates constantly (Why does it do this?).

So I looked around and found my Arduino(Uno) and thought I could turn my phone on with this.

However, I found a few problems. (BTW, all info in this image http://vifocal.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/38c4fbe4447791bfb2ff7ebb56cba1e8/h/u/huawei3c_1.jpg)

1) There were 4 terminals. 2 marked with + and - (What are the other 2?)

2) Battery outputs 3.8V while my Arduino has 5V and 3.3V (Which to use?)

3) Is it even possible to try such thing (Could it work?)

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closed as off-topic by uint128_t, Bence Kaulics, placeholder, Daniel Grillo, Nick Alexeev Jun 7 '16 at 21:47

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions on the use of electronic devices are off-topic as this site is intended specifically for questions on electronics design." – uint128_t, Bence Kaulics, placeholder, Daniel Grillo, Nick Alexeev
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Before we can answer, we need to know: Have you stopped misbehaving? \$\endgroup\$ – Mark Jun 7 '16 at 0:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ Question 1) has been asked before. Here's an answer. \$\endgroup\$ – Nick Alexeev Jun 7 '16 at 1:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ @NickAlexeev Wait, what does SDA and SCL stand for \$\endgroup\$ – Guy named Jon Jun 7 '16 at 1:08
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    \$\begingroup\$ Don't try it. If the battery outputs 3.8V you need a 3.8V source. There are many other limitations as well. Just wait until you get your battery back. If you find another way to power your phone, make sure that it has the same specs of the battery. If you undertake this(you must really want to use your phone if you are thinking about powering it with an arduino), just know that there is a big risk. You may break your phone. \$\endgroup\$ – zack1544 Jun 7 '16 at 1:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ You rogue... Imma tell your father ! \$\endgroup\$ – dim Jun 7 '16 at 12:39
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IF you had a proper bench power supply, you could just provide power. You could simply dial in the voltage (and current limit) and try connecting to your phone.

But even if you could do that, the phone may refuse to play unless it can "talk" to the battery through those other two terminals. Many devices like that need to know WHO the battery is, and WHAT its current condition is. And if you can't simulate that, you are out of luck even with the correct voltage and current.

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In case you've stopped misbehaving..here's something: Arduino cannot help you to run your phone ANYHOW. Simplest thing to do would be to get a bench power supply and do some fine wiring to the phone. Best would be to check what those pins are for (on phone too), maybe you need just to hook some together (although it's very small % of possibilities for doing that).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Cant I just provide power? \$\endgroup\$ – Guy named Jon Jun 7 '16 at 1:43
  • \$\begingroup\$ I don't think you understand the nor definition of power nor use of Arduino. Definition of power is voltage * currect, which means, you should produce both for power suppling the phone. You technically "can provide power" from arduino, but be sure it won't be enough. Arduinos are microcontrollers, which are ment to deal with input/output devices (such as sensors and motors), not to be used as power supply to something so "greedy" as is cell phone. You more than arduino need a bench power supply. As I've said before, check the datasheet of phone and find out, what those pins are. \$\endgroup\$ – Jakey Jun 7 '16 at 10:55

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