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I'm trying to build a Radio controlled TX and RX circuit (using a 2.4 GHz chip and MCUs), to control a robot with four DC geared motors.

I plan to use four momentary on-off-on switches on the TX side to control each corresponding motor on the RX side, but I'm not sure how to accomplish this. From what I understand each momentary on-off-on switch is a "DPDT switch" made from two SPDT switches, so it can control four different circuits. I'm not sure how I should connect them or how this will translate to each channel on the RX end.

What I'm looking to do in simple terms is, when I push a switch up, the corresponding motor will go forward. When I release the switch and it's in its centre open position, the motor will stop. When I push the switch down, the motor go in reverse.

Can you explain to me how I can achieve this?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What's your question? \$\endgroup\$ – Chu Jun 9 '16 at 16:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Chu Question added \$\endgroup\$ – somers Jun 9 '16 at 16:15
  • \$\begingroup\$ You will probably find it easier to build this with 2.4GHz modules and a small MCU on each end, which is basically how hobby grade RC gear has worked in recent years. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Jun 9 '16 at 17:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Chris Stratton Why would I need a MCU at each end? \$\endgroup\$ – somers Jun 10 '16 at 10:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ With packetized 2.4 GHz radios because their interface is complex. With something else, because it is easier and more versatile than the old ways of multiplexing and demultiplexing. As with many projects it is best to research existing solutions fitting the application before building anything. The Holtek parts are not meant to work with RC ESCs. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Jun 10 '16 at 14:05
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The HT12x modules appear to be very basic and simple contact-closure transmitting systems. If you press the button on the transmitting end, the signal on the receiving end activates. There is no PWM or other kinds of logic happening here. If you need PWM, etc, then you need something more sophisticated.

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