0
\$\begingroup\$

I'm putting together a bank of 3 batteries, connected in parallel for use in a solar PV system. The primary load will come from a 1000W inverter (2000w surge). The inverter manual recommends using a 3ft. run of 25mm^2 cable to connect to the batteries.

Is the size of the interconnects dependent on the maximum load the batteries can be expected to deliver or is there another factor which needs to be considered?

Edit: The battery bank consists of 3x 12V AGM batteries. The inverter draws 1000W @ 13V under normal operation but will pull 2000W @ 13V for brief periods when necessary. This means I should use wire that can carry 154 amps (2000W / 13V = 153.8 amps) from the battery bank to the inverter. Should the size of wires used to connect the batteries together be calculated using the same amount of current (154 amps, which is the largest load that will be connected to them)?

\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ This is a power question and I'm not up to it. That said, I do know anyone who's qualified to answer will want the current, not just the wattage. \$\endgroup\$ – st2000 Jun 12 '16 at 22:22
0
\$\begingroup\$

YES, for safety you should use wiring of a capacity adequate for the maximum load. There may be other mitigating factors, but it appears that you are not at the point where you can consider the more subtle aspects of the problem. Use cable rated for the max current and remain safe.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.