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I have a solar panels, with 5v with a 200ma output, I have it so this goes to a charge module which allows 3.7v lithium batteries to charge without exploding on me. If i hook another solar panel, same as the last one, into my build, will this put too much voltage into the charger module and blow my unit?

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    \$\begingroup\$ It all depends on how you define "hook another solar panel", Try drawing a circuit so that someone can answer. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Jun 20 '16 at 10:28
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If you connect plain solar panels in parallell, you only need to worry about the maximum current your battery/ies can safley take. Your regulator seems to be able to take 1 A of current, so theoretically you can use about three of them in paralell. It does not say weither your solar panels are not plain solar panels or have built in 5 V regulators (both types exists), your situation might be slightly different since you can end up with light on one panel and not the other and of the panels are connected in parallel, your will feed 5 V on the output on all of them. They may or may not like this. If you get three panels and three regulators, I see no problem since the charger modules have constant current output.

In case your panels are smart with buil-in 5 V regulation and might be damanged by 5 V on the output with no light on the panel:

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

In case your solar panels are just panels with no internal regulation:

schematic

simulate this circuit

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    \$\begingroup\$ Where does it say that they have regulators built in to them? Shouldn't you be recommending blocking diodes when wiring in parallel? \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Jun 20 '16 at 10:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ If they output 5 V, they must have. Yes, a diode per panel would solve many problems. Perhaps I should add a schematic. \$\endgroup\$ – winny Jun 20 '16 at 11:07
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    \$\begingroup\$ They don't have regulators built into them because that would be non-cost-effective for that size panel. I think you need to rethink the usefulness of your answer. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Jun 20 '16 at 11:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Andyaka In that case they lie about 5 V in the specification. \$\endgroup\$ – winny Jun 20 '16 at 11:28
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    \$\begingroup\$ They don't lie - they just imply that if there is enough light on the thing it will produce 5V with a current of 200mA into an appropriate load. It's not a great spec but it doesn't lie. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Jun 20 '16 at 11:34

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