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So my problem is that I need to wire up a 5 pin LED switch to a motor and a car battery. Seems easy enough... But I need the LED to be on at all times. That is the bit I'm getting stuck with.

enter image description here

Now if you look at the picture I have wired 2 & 4 together, then 1 to the negative on the battery and 5 to the positive on the battery. (I have not done anything to 3) Now this makes the light constantly on. But how do I connect the motor to this so when I press the button the light is still on and the motor works? Is it even possible? also can you dumb it down with any technical terms as I am not an expert.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Motor works? You want to use this as a push to start button? Uh... \$\endgroup\$ – Passerby Jun 22 '16 at 0:58
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    \$\begingroup\$ what would really help is some documentation for this part, or a part number we can look up. \$\endgroup\$ – Jasen Jun 22 '16 at 0:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ Wait so you want it so that when you hold the button down, the LED turns on and turns on the motor? \$\endgroup\$ – Bradman175 Jun 22 '16 at 0:59
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Now you haven't given us the exact model of which LED switch you are using but the 5 pins probably look something like this:

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

By the looks of the image, 1 and 5 is where the LED connects where 5 would be the anode (positive connection) and 1 would be the cathode (negative) connection. This is the reason why the LED stays on.

This leaves us with 2, 3 and 4 for the switch. There would be a common, NC and NO. Get a continuity meter or a simple open circuit with an LED (or buzzer) like the following (you could even use the LED in the switch):

schematic

simulate this circuit

And try which one of pins 2,3 or 4 are shorted together (making the LED light up or the continuity meter beep) while NOT pressing the push button. Then hold the push button down and try again. The pin that is used in the two experiments is the common, while the others are when it's push and when it's not pushed (NO and NC).

If your switch is good enough to handle the current of the motor (which must be pretty high), then do a circuit like this:

schematic

simulate this circuit

This means the LED will always be on and the button just turns the motor on and off.

If your switch can't handle motor current, then you may need a relay that can handle the high currents.

schematic

simulate this circuit

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