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My laptop charger adapter broke and I a have this other old adaptor in the house. They both have the same voltage(19V) and 1.58A. The first adapter(The one that broke) has three wires (black, white, and red) going out which then connect to the laptop charger pin. The second adapter however, has three wires going out. I have read that an extra wire is used as some kind of a sensor. In another forum someone identified the sensor wire and left it out in the connection. What does the three wires represent each(which is neutral or positive)?

I simply need a easy fix for my charger. While you attempt to answer please note that I do not have a multimeter or any tool for checking current and voltage except for a tester screw driver and that Except for high school physics I do not know anything else in electricity. I also hope that this is the right place to ask this question.

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closed as off-topic by PeterJ, R Drast, dim, Daniel Grillo, Dmitry Grigoryev Jun 24 '16 at 13:09

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions on the repair of consumer electronics, appliances, or other devices must involve specific troubleshooting steps and demonstrate a good understanding of the underlying design of the device being repaired. See also: Is asking on how to fix a faulty circuit on topic?" – R Drast, dim, Daniel Grillo, Dmitry Grigoryev
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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If you do not use a multimeter to verify that you made the right connections regarding + and -, you risk damaging the laptop.

Please consider if that is an acceptable risk to you. It is much less risk to simply get a new adapter. New adapters are almost always cheaper than having your laptop repaired.

The 3rd wire might be used for adapter identification. If your laptop needs that identification then it will not charge the battery when you're using the 2-wire adapter.

Again a reason to get the proper charger and not fiddle around with this.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This is very helpful. I guess the your caution really sank in. I'll take it to a real electrician to figure it out. Then I'll post the findings. Or I'll just have to buy a new one. \$\endgroup\$ – Stephen Nyamweya Jun 24 '16 at 10:43
  • \$\begingroup\$ Real electricians charge more for looking at something than the price of a proper adapter (at least in my country). If the electrician is a lot cheaper, I would doubt his/her abilities. You can also by an "HP compatible" charger, these are usually much cheaper and should work just as well as the HP branded ones. \$\endgroup\$ – Bimpelrekkie Jun 24 '16 at 11:36
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According to the convention, Black one is neutral.

And I'm assuming Red(which is mostly used) wire is positive. You can test it with tester. If you put the plug in power line and test the red one, tester light should on.

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