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I'm looking for an 6 pin .1 standard edge connector to program for production my board without any connector. And I cannot find the number of cycle they can support.

Does anyone has used such connector for production ? In this case which one ? I only managed to find on .05 sullins connector that they support 500 min cycles

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This question is off-topic electronics.stackexchange.com/help/on-topic we don't discuss electronic components selection. Why? because we would probably just to a digikey search or google search, which you probably have access to. \$\endgroup\$ – laptop2d Jul 5 '16 at 16:01
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    \$\begingroup\$ Well, I don't read it as a shopping question. He's not seeking for a specific product, he's questioning the reliability of it. \$\endgroup\$ – dim Jul 5 '16 at 16:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ My link to digikey was to show the type of connector I was referring to. My problem was that in datasheets of the edge connector on the list haven't any reliability cycle numbers. So I was looking for information/feedback on the reliability for this type of connector \$\endgroup\$ – Franck Jul 6 '16 at 8:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ Got an answer from AMP. 20 cycles for 0.4um gold and 50 for 0,8um gold. So not usable even for product small production \$\endgroup\$ – Franck Jul 6 '16 at 16:20
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Edge connector sockets, like you might put on a motherboard, are not designed for a large number of insertions.

If you want a way to make a temporary connection to pads on a board in a production environment, build a fixture that incorporates pogo pins, which are expressly designed for this kind of application.

I once used a modified "dip clip" for a similar purpose in a low-volume production environment.

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They used to use edge connectors for cartridges on toys. If the contact area is large, it seems like they can hold up OK, but I can't give you an actual cycle count. I worked on one project where an edge connector was used on a toy, but it was not customer accessible. During product development, we used it a lot, but I doubt very many units got to 500 cycles. Never had a single failure that I can remember, though.

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