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Hello im completely new at this subject, so this might be a "newbie" question, but i need some help with finding some components, if they exist.

I would just like to know the names of the components and know if im using them right.


Component 1: A detailed picture of the component

As you might see, i want to reverse the motor spin direction with the component "S2".

Questions:

  • Name?
  • How to use it? (Using the switch)
  • Can it be done with a remote controled circut?

Component 2: Remote controlled switch

This might be a less obvious drawing, but my goal here is that i have 1 energy source, and the remote reciever has to recieve a lower voltage (I forgot to draw the resistor) than the component on the other half of the circut (LED). Which also is the why the component LED is not connected in a serial connection.

In the real project the LED could be anything, but i drew it to clear it up. So I want to be able to turn switch S1 ON / OFF with a remote control. The voltage running through S2 is lower than the one in S1, and i therfor want them to not get in contact.

Questions:

  • Name?
  • How to use it? (Using the switch)


Currently i do not know, which battery, motor or reciever im going to use.

I hope i made myself clear,

Thanks in advance. :)

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  • \$\begingroup\$ "So what the component 'S1' has to do is turn a switch on / off without interrupting / affecting the current running through the switch". This statement is confusing because it reads as if you want switch S2 to turn OFF (S2's contacts should open) and not stop the flow of current; this is now how switches are designed to work. Are you maybe trying to describe a "latching relay circuit" which has separate START and STOP buttons? \$\endgroup\$ – Jim Fischer Jul 11 '16 at 15:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ My mistake :) I want to be able to turn switch S1 ON / OFF with a remote control. The voltage running through S2 is lower than the one in S1, and i therfor want them to not get in contact. \$\endgroup\$ – user1509104 Jul 11 '16 at 16:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ Correction: "... this is now how switches ..." => c/now/not/ \$\endgroup\$ – Jim Fischer Jul 11 '16 at 16:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ See also : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switch#Contact_terminology. especially read the table of some switches \$\endgroup\$ – Always Confused Jul 11 '16 at 18:48
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  • Component 1 is a 2-pole, 2-way or double-pole, double-throw (DPDT) switch.
  • You have drawn it correctly. When the switch is thrown the motor will reverse.

The second circuit is as clear as mud. I think you just want to switch a load with the remote receiver.

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

Figure 1. A typical method of solving this.

  • Use a voltage regulator to step down the voltage to your receiver.
  • When the receiver output turns high it switches on the transistor which switches on the load from your unregulated supply. Any small signal NPN transistor will do.

... but my goal here is that i have 1 energy source,

That's the 9 V battery.

... and the remote receiver has to receive a lower voltage (I forgot to draw the resistor) than the component

That's the 7805 voltage regulator. A resistor isn't suitable as the voltage at the end of it varies with current. The regulator maintains a constant voltage output; +5 V for the 7805. That may or may not be what you want for your receiver. C1 and C2 prevent the regulator from oscillating and are recommended in the datasheet.

The receiver has to have an output to be any use.

... receiver has to receive a lower voltage ... than the component on the other half of the circut (LED).

If you want to use a low-voltage receiver to switch a higher voltage load the standard approach is to use a transistor as shown.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for the help, but the circuit schematic might be a little too advanced for my current experience. Could you "dumb" it down? :) \$\endgroup\$ – user1509104 Jul 11 '16 at 16:15
  • \$\begingroup\$ Tell us (1) what your battery voltage is. (2) What your receiver is and what voltage it requires. (3) What your load is and what voltage it requires. Add the info in your question so that it's all in one place. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Jul 11 '16 at 16:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ I changed my question as asked, and as it says i currently do not know which battery, motor or reciever (By name) since some of these will be scrap parts. \$\endgroup\$ – user1509104 Jul 11 '16 at 17:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ Are the Component 1 and Component 2 questions related? (If not, why did you put both in the same question?) Are you trying to remote control a motor with forward / reverse control? Do you need to be able to switch it off too? \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Jul 11 '16 at 17:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ They are project related, 1 component: Remote control a motor, both ways. 2 component: Be able to turn a switch ON / OFF with another electrical signal. (Where the signal in the one and second wire never meet) \$\endgroup\$ – user1509104 Jul 11 '16 at 18:09
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Component 1

Switch S2 is a "double pole, double throw" type. See also this article titled "Switch Basics" on the SparkFun.com website.

A circuit that can be automated (e.g., controlled via software running on a microcontroller), that can reverse the voltage polarity across a motor or other load, is called an "H-bridge" circuit.

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For component 2, I think you want a relay.

A relay is essentially an electrically operated switch. Conventional mechanical relays have a coil (electromagnet) that moves the switch contacts when energised.

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