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This problem is from my textbook chapter review question, and it seems a lot different from the example provided by textbook, so I have no idea what to do.

I even have solution manual for this, but still, I'm totally lost.

I drew the table as following: enter image description here

I set don't care condition as d(0,1,2,13,14,15).

Textbook solution is: w(A,B,C,D)=m(11,12) x(A,B,C,D)=m(7,8,9,10) y(A,B,C,D)=m(5,6,9,10) z(A,B,C,D)=m(4,6,8,10,12)

Please help me how to get those min-terms based on what method. Some min-terms are selected when both excess-3 and binary both have the value of 0. (especially on 'w')

Only one thing I can figure out is how to get the min-terms for 'z' which is z(A,B,C,D)=m(4,6,8,10,12) where I can just place 1 in k-map followed by the value of the last digit on excess-3 table

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Only one thing I understand is how to get the 'z' which is z(A,B,C,D)=m(4,6,8,10,12) where I can just place 1 in k-map followed by the value of the last digit on excess-3 table. \$\endgroup\$ – Minjae Jul 11 '16 at 21:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ A Don't Care condition can be true or false as needed. Do your K-Maps and update your question with what you find. Sometimes it is just a matter of ignoring a solution and doing it yourself. \$\endgroup\$ – StainlessSteelRat Jul 12 '16 at 0:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ Use karnaughs mapping.For each w,x,y and z. \$\endgroup\$ – Zulfiqar Ali Nov 22 '18 at 19:38
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yes it is correct the answer in textbook: ex: w(A,B,C,D)=m(11,12) ur answer like this w(A,B,C,D)=m(8,9),just add 3 to each number and u will get same answer like the book 8+3=11. 9+3=12.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The numbers can't just b added isn't? \$\endgroup\$ – Umar Jan 7 '17 at 13:32
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when we find a minterm in w,x,y,z the excess binary decimal number is the output like we have minterm in w are 9 and 10 and the excess three binary decimal nmbr in front of 9 and 10 are 11 and 12.

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