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Common textbook symbol antenna

This is a very common- symbol used in school-textbooks as a symbol for antenna.

This website (http://www.chegg.com/homework-help/questions-and-answers/figure-shows-arrangement-generating-traveling-electromagnetic-wave-shortwave-radio-region--q1017746) mentioned this as the symbol of Transmission line.

enter image description here (http://s3.amazonaws.com/answer-board-image/8700a5dc-2c5e-473c-89d3-2a6dde823364.gif).

However, I did-not found any information about this symbol in google and wikipedia. As well, outside school-textbooks I yet not seen this symbol in any professional circuit diagram. What is this symbol? and in which sign-convention it is/was used?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ You mean the dipole antenna symbol? electronic-symbols.com/electric-electronic-symbols/… or the twisted pair that stands for a transmission line? \$\endgroup\$ Jul 14, 2016 at 10:17
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    \$\begingroup\$ I meant the symbol looking like a twisted pair. i.e. horizontal, DNA-like symbol. i.e. the first-one. And in second image the horizontal, DNA-shaped symbol \$\endgroup\$
    – user107801
    Jul 14, 2016 at 10:19
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    \$\begingroup\$ It written right under it: transmission line. When they are generic, sometimes people represent them with coaxial cables, sometimes with twisted pairs. No biggie. Try googling "twisted pair symbol" and look at the pictures \$\endgroup\$ Jul 14, 2016 at 10:25
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    \$\begingroup\$ that's a twisted pair. \$\endgroup\$ Jul 14, 2016 at 10:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ thanks. Somehow I knew it wrongly. The symbol, mostly used in the chapter of discovery of generating electromagnetic wave by Hertz. But in these diagrams, since that is not separately pointed than antenna, I knew this symbol as antenna. \$\endgroup\$
    – user107801
    Jul 14, 2016 at 10:46

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This symbol is the common way to draw a twisted pair.

Note that this is common, in literature, and very intuitive, but this isn't the standard way.

This is a twisted pair in standards:

enter image description here

And this is antenna:

enter image description here

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