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While writing an instruction document for configuring an evaluation board's firmware, involving the repeated installation and removal of jumpers, I used the terms "install", "connect" and "reconnect" to describe putting a jumper in place. I used the term "remove" for taking it out.

One of the reviewers thinks that "connect" is a wrong term, as it may confuse the user, as in "connect to what?".

So I was wondering, are there correct terms to describe these two actions?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Wouldn't it be most unambiguous to use "short pins x and y using jumper" or something similar? As for connect, you can turn that into connect pins using jumper. As for confusing a users, well as soon as you're using jumpers, you've eliminated lusers, and if your users are going to be configuring a board's firmware, they should at least be able to determine when you're telling them to use a jumper. Also you can use construction "connect jumper to pins X and Y" too. \$\endgroup\$ – AndrejaKo Jan 8 '12 at 4:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ I would just "put a jumper on pins x1 and x2", or whatever. \$\endgroup\$ – tcrosley Jan 9 '12 at 0:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ Are you talking only about jumpers on three pins also? I think of the kind that can have two positions a-b or b-c, while completely removing the jumper is not a normal use. \$\endgroup\$ – Volker Siegel Apr 9 '14 at 2:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ @VolkerSiegel - it was a long time ago, but I think this one was specifically the two-pin type. \$\endgroup\$ – ysap Apr 9 '14 at 5:13
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If I were writing formally, I would probably speak of "installing a jumper".

If I were speaking informally, I'd probably talk about "strapping" or "jumpering" something.

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    \$\begingroup\$ well, "Please jumper jumper J1" sounds a little funny 8-) \$\endgroup\$ – ysap Jan 8 '12 at 15:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ Why not use the verb "jump" Please jump jumper J1 ;D \$\endgroup\$ – Madcowswe Jan 9 '12 at 16:58
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Install or insert are good. Connect is poor unless you specify pins as @AnrejaKo said.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, I like "insert" more. \$\endgroup\$ – ysap Jan 8 '12 at 5:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ I don't. Your not putting it into something as much as on something. \$\endgroup\$ – Olin Lathrop Jan 8 '12 at 13:46
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I have usually seen "install" and "remove", and I think those are fine. I'm assuming we're talking about sliding on the little black shorting blocks over two pins spaced .1" apart, right?

I don't like "insert" as much because you're not really putting the shorting block into something as much as on to someting.

I agree with your reviewer in not liking "connect". Presumably these are instructions for non-technical users. You shouldn't assume they know that the little black thingy makes a connection when installed, and that is a irrelevant implementation detail at the user interface level anyway.

Sometimes boards are designed so the same number of jumpers is always present. This can be useful since non-electrical user won't have access to new jumpers when they need to add some. In that case, jumpers are "moved" to one of the allowable positions: Move the jumper at J1 to the A position. Or if you want to make it sound like a Japanese product so people won't even think of calling a support line: Please to move jumper J1 honerable position A onto

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  • \$\begingroup\$ LOL, do you mean something like "All your base are belong to us"? You are right in your assumption - it is these little familiar jumpers. There are a couple of unrelated pin-pairs, they don't come in blocks, and are labeled J1, J2 etc. So I thought "install jumper J1" is a little too "heavy" - as we are not really installing, like in putting in a piece of the mechanism. \$\endgroup\$ – ysap Jan 8 '12 at 15:36
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I'd use "please set jumper XY", but be warned as English isn't my native language.

On Jumper (computing) I found

Informally, technicians often call setting jumpers "strapping". To adjust the SCSI ID jumpers on a hard drive, for example, is to "strap it up".

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