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I think the title is revealing. I'm planning to use 2 multi-meters to get a better perspective of my circuits. Is there any drawback in this situation i should be aware?

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Yes, that works. However, keep in mind that no meter is perfect. Ideally, voltmeters have infinite impedance and current meters 0 impedance. Real ones don't, of course.

To the extent the meters aren't perfect, particulary the current meter, it will affect the system while trying to measure it. The current meter will cause some voltage drop proportional to the current. You have to be aware of this and possibly account for it. For example, if the voltage drop across the current meter is too big to just ignore, you have to consider carefully on what side of the current meter you measure the voltage, and whether your system can tolerate the voltage drop in the first place.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Unless the ammeter is really crummy or the current level is really high, there should be no measurable interference between the two meters. \$\endgroup\$ – Hot Licks Jul 23 '16 at 0:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ The higher end multimeters are actually worse for measuring current in ELV system because they use fuses that have higher safety ratings but also higher resistance. Often it's better to add a resistor of your chosing to the circuit and use the multimeter in voltage mode (this also has the advantage that you can remove the multimeter without breaking the circuit). \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Green Jul 23 '16 at 3:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ "real voltage meters aren't perfect" - I would put a mosfet voltage follower to both inputs. Where does that put me? \$\endgroup\$ – John Dvorak Jul 23 '16 at 5:00
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    \$\begingroup\$ It would be more n00b friendly to spell out that the current taken by a voltmeter is unlikely to alter the current reading. The voltage drop on an ammeter is likely to alter the voltage reading. So choose connection points appropriately. \$\endgroup\$ – Neil_UK Jul 23 '16 at 5:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Neil_UK please make that an answer. \$\endgroup\$ – winny Jul 23 '16 at 8:04
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Yes, you can. No real draw back unless you get to very small fractions of a volt or micro amp ranges and your precision requirements are tight. Or very high voltages and currents that your multimeter wasn't designed to handle well.

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Bear in mind we're assuming digital voltmeters here, an analog meter will have an ohms per volt characteristic (google is your friend if you don't understand this).

Digital meters usually have a fixed impedance but this value will dependly largely on the quality (and price) of the meter.

I agree about probe fuse resistances being high, stick the meter onto ohms and short the probes, on mine it's about 8 ohms.

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I don't think it is a big deal, you can use. But calibration matters before you taking the reading. Do it couple of times. So you can stick to the precise value

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    \$\begingroup\$ (1) "But calibration matters ...". Explain how the OP could calibrate. (2) "Do it couple of times." Explain why. (3) "So you can stick to the precise value." What does this mean? Welcome to EE.SE but be aware that poor answers can get voted down. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Jul 23 '16 at 8:47

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