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I am thinking to control the physical world by applying signals to a magical material.

The material must have the ability to change its strength from a very solid state to a dough like state back and forth. So for example if I want to grip an object I just need to set the voltage to low and the material becomes like a dough, soft, and can reshape and does the gripping, then I set another voltage and it becomes solid and I can move the object by electrical motors.

Does such a material exists? It is a feasible idea?

I know my question and the idea behind it is vague. But my objective is very precise: "Changing the strength of materials, using some sort of electrical signal", possible?

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    \$\begingroup\$ There are piezoelectric "inchworms" which grip/release by stretching or bending against a fixed channel. See also "ferrofluid" which shapes itself according to magnetic field. Not a solid, however. \$\endgroup\$
    – user16324
    Commented Jul 23, 2016 at 9:29
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    \$\begingroup\$ Some useful search terms: "Electrorheological fluid" and "Magnetorheological fluid" (also "Magnetorheological elastomer") \$\endgroup\$
    – Dave Tweed
    Commented Jul 23, 2016 at 11:15

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A form of motion generation found in some robotics applications is "muscle wire" which changes length when you apply voltage (to heat it up). Nitinol and Flexinol are two of the brand names available. Muscle wire is one form of shape-memory alloy.

Ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shape-memory_alloy

Example: https://www.sparkfun.com/products/11900

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sounds like you want a ferrofluid these are liquids that harden in the presence of magnetic fields.

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