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pic of label: https://i.imgur.com/gKfhmZ3.jpg

See how they marked off something there? The voltage i think. here in this country the normal voltage is 220. The powerboard is imported from germany, and they have it at 230 V. Would that difference affect anything? I bought this without no box, its how its sold. Its the only brand of powerboard sold here thats not generic. its cheaper than APC or alike, for some reason its cornered the market. It also has its plastic pealing off in places for some reason. The other alternative to this from same company is an aluminum one, i guess that one comes without the plastic pealing.

pic of powerboard: https://i.imgur.com/npP4CeY.jpg

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closed as off-topic by Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams, Sparky256, Daniel Grillo, laptop2d, Nick Alexeev Aug 1 '16 at 19:44

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions on the use of electronic devices are off-topic as this site is intended specifically for questions on electronics design." – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams, Sparky256, Daniel Grillo, laptop2d, Nick Alexeev
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ It will work fine to 250V AC at the rated current. The insulation withstand is probably of the order of 500VAC in practice to cope with surges and manufacturing tolerances. All is well and it is just a national rating difference. All those 'Euro' plugs and sockets can handle 250V AC by design. \$\endgroup\$ – KalleMP Aug 1 '16 at 8:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ Please post pngs with the image tool, thanks. If you can't find a png then please be respectful of the community and convert it, Thanks (Most people won't even bother to read the question if its not formatted correctly) Please also see electronics.stackexchange.com/help/how-to-ask for help on writing good questions. Thanks \$\endgroup\$ – laptop2d Aug 1 '16 at 16:25
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For normal electronics, 230V and 220V are the same thing (these are AC voltages anyhow and your devices likely convert them to DC using a regulator circuit).

Furthermore, if you plug it in to your wall, your wall socket will supply 220V and that is what will be delivered to your devices. The powerboard will not change the voltage that is supplied to it.

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No, it will not affect anything. The voltage of the power strip is a recommended maximum voltage that it's designed for. The power strip will work with any voltage up to that (and probably several tens of volts higher at least).

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I believe the IEC standard is that LV appliances should tolerate a 5% variation from nominal voltage. For Australian Standards (specifically) it's a 6% variation. \$\endgroup\$ – Li-aung Yip Aug 1 '16 at 17:14
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There is no practical difference between a mains power strip running at 220V vs. 230V (or even 240V) The utility mains voltage is not all that precice. It would not be unusual to find mains voltage varying 5% or more in many parts of the world where those things are used.

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