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I am about to design a Nixie clock and at the moment, I am doing some research. However my doubt is how to treat Nixie tube. For example, a simple circuit for switching Nixie on and off with: anode resistor, nixie and common emmiter in cathode. If transistor is off, what is the voltage in collector? I suppose there should be: Supply voltage - Ra*InverseCollectorCurrent - Vnixie(InverseCollectorCurrent)

In this case what could be the maximum collector voltage in such a circuit and how to dimension my transistor?

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    \$\begingroup\$ you might be interested in the recent nixie tubes video of mrcarlsonslab on youtube. \$\endgroup\$ – PlasmaHH Aug 12 '16 at 12:21
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    \$\begingroup\$ The NIXIE Tube, and How To Use Them \$\endgroup\$ – Steve G Aug 12 '16 at 13:07
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Just use MMBTA42 transistors, which are rated at 300V and cost less than 5 cents each USD in quantity.

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I recommend you read this: http://www.decodesystems.com/nixie.html

Under 'drive circuit' for a Nixie tube running off a 150V supply and using an NPN transistor switch in the cathode, Vce will apparently not rise to more than half of the supply (if at least one other Nixie digit is turned on). I would still pick a transistor with a Vce rating high enough to withstand the full supply voltage.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Where does that come from? \$\endgroup\$ – Nexy_sm Aug 12 '16 at 21:46

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