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I want to learn principles of work of devices like diode, bipolar junction transistor and MOSFET. I tried to find answer on google and I found it, but problem is I don't understand branch of physics dealing with pn junction and other things. Which field of physics is neccessary to understand in order to be able to understand principle of work of devices I mentioned? Just to mention that I have not problems understanding mathematics behind it, I have problems with physics.

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Basic, generic physics. You don't even need to understand or know about the cloud model for electrons. You can pick even that much up as you go along, really. You need to understand all the basic SI units, what they mean, how they are used and applied, the basic idea of dimensional analysis, etc. The first volume of Feynman's Lecture series on physics is more than enough, I'd imagine.

I'd recommend volume 1 of Feynman's lecture series on physics (volume 2 if you want to get into electromagnetism, too), a book by Jacob Millman called "Microelectronics" (nearly any edition is fine) for diode and transistor discussions that are easy to follow, a book called "Matter & Interactions" with at least the 3rd edition as it is provides a very intuitive understanding of rather deep physical ideas,...

But to be honest? Just Jacob Millman's Microelectronics, and even then only perhaps the first four or five chapters, is enough to get the basic ideas in your head.

I've found the web to be near to useless on this, though.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks a lot! I found Feynman's Lecture series on feynman's official site. Is it enough or I should find somewhere book, first volume of Feynman's Lecture series? \$\endgroup\$
    – zeti
    Commented Aug 25, 2016 at 0:39
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    \$\begingroup\$ No. In this case, they recently (year ago?) placed all three volumes on the web. That's PERFECT to use. The books are, in my opinion, worth having in book form, too. But it's money. So use the web versions. That's great. \$\endgroup\$
    – jonk
    Commented Aug 25, 2016 at 1:28
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    \$\begingroup\$ Jacob Millman's Microelectronics is probably one of the easier books on diodes and transistors to follow. Even then, though, take it slow and make SURE you think carefully through each step and get a feel for the meaning behind things. When he early talks about the electric field, in volts per meter, you should stop yourself and make sure you understand the idea and why those units might make sense. (And remember that a volt is really a Joule per Coulomb of charge.) Just take it slow, think, test out the ideas in your head. Don't go forward until you have the idea. Then go to the next step. \$\endgroup\$
    – jonk
    Commented Aug 25, 2016 at 1:31
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    \$\begingroup\$ Bohr's atomic model and basic electromagnetic field theory should be sufficient IMO, and maybe some elementary quantum mechanics. When I studied electrical engineering I hadn't even heard of Richard Feynman. \$\endgroup\$
    – Bart
    Commented Aug 25, 2016 at 11:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Bart: Millman manages to cover what's needed in the first few chapters without any electromagnetic theory (which is covered, though, in vol 2 of Feynman's lecture series), at all. The ideas are very simple. Work functions, a fraction of an idea about atomic bonds, some basic idea of thermal agitation, and a near trivial idea of a cloud model for electrons. And a basic idea of position, velocity, acceleration, and collisions. The Hall effect might need some idea of electromagnetism. But you can get the idea without much to go on. \$\endgroup\$
    – jonk
    Commented Aug 25, 2016 at 15:59
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Millman's microelectronics is definitely great. But, most people find it difficult to understand, either the language or so. If you face any such problem, prefer 'Streetman & Banerjee, Solid State Electronic Devices'. It is very comprehensive and the same goes for this book as well; a clear understanding of first few chapters is sufficient for the topics you mentioned.

For MOSFET, check out Adel Sedra and Kenneth Smith's Microelectronics. The basics are laid down very clearly with all the physics associated, in an easy to understand language.

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