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Recently, I built a fuzz effect for my guitar, and it all works great except for one thing: no sound is coming through the amp until I press the footswitch; then, the fuzz effect comes through. Normally, the guitar should play as normal through the amp, and by pressing the footswitch it should simply add the effect. The image I found to create the pedal was this visualization:

As you can see, the build involves two potentiometers, one for volume and one for gain. What I DIDN'T notice before building it was that the 100k was a logarithmic pot and the 5k was a linear. Both of the pots I used in the circuit were linear. Could this have something to do with the main issue? Trying to figure this out before I go and buy the log 100k pot. If it's not the issue, any ideas what could be causing this?

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    \$\begingroup\$ could you please use the schematic editor and post this as schematic? \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Aug 28 '16 at 18:56
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No that's not the problem. Putting the wrong potentiometer in will just have the effect that most of the control seems to be over a restricted angle of the pot with very little change occurring over the rest of the travel.

enter image description here

Figure 1. Tracing the straight-through signal.

Finding the fault should be easy enough using a multimeter on continuity test.

  • Test from 1 to 2.
  • Test from 1 to 3.
  • Check that you have continuity to 4 alternating off with each switch press.
  • Test at 5 to check the loop integrity.
  • 6 should also alternate on and off with the switch.
  • Check at 7 and 8.
  • Finally, there should be a ground connection to 9 but this may be done through the metal box.

Report back.


I did ... add a ground wire to the output and that fix it 100%. I've been looking at the output the entire time wondering why it only had one wire attached. I dismissed this as the issue though because I could hear the fuzz effect fine ... strange.

The fuzz signal is amplified so that and some stray capacitance between the circuit and the guitar lead shield may have been enough to give the impression of working. Let's hope you don't decide the ungrounded version sounds better.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ All of the points checked out fine. I did, however, add a ground wire to the output and that fix it 100%. I've been looking at the output the entire time wondering why it only had one wire attached. I dismissed this as the issue though because I could hear the fuzz effect fine.. strange. Well whatever the reason, it fixed it. Thanks! \$\endgroup\$ – MH0517 Aug 28 '16 at 20:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ See the update. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Aug 28 '16 at 20:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, I did indeed notice the fuzz sounded significantly better when grounded. \$\endgroup\$ – MH0517 Aug 28 '16 at 20:24

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