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What would happen if I used a battery charger rated for 230VAC 50Hz input here in USA where we use 60 Hz? Would it be ok? What side effects may happen because of the mismatch in input frequency with the specs of the charger? Is the reaction of the magnetic core of the charger to the different frequency the only concern I should have? What might this do long term to the charger? Might it fail prematurely? I would use 230V 60Hz input on this charger by using a pair of phase locked (but reverse phase) 115V 60Hz lines so it would be a true 230V 60Hz 15A capable power source.

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closed as off-topic by brhans, Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams, Voltage Spike, Daniel Grillo, PeterJ Sep 13 '16 at 12:44

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    \$\begingroup\$ 99.9% chance everything will work normally. Does the input voltage (range) match? \$\endgroup\$ – winny Sep 12 '16 at 18:17
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    \$\begingroup\$ @winny - Yes the input voltage available to the charger and the chargers recommended operating voltage would match exactly. The only mismatch would be I would be feeding the battery charger 60hz AC rather than the 50 Hz it is rated for. Hope that clarifies. \$\endgroup\$ – David Sep 12 '16 at 18:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ If it would be me, I would just go for it. Iron losses will be higher but capacitor ripple will be lower. There are design margins for these kind of things. Report your findings! \$\endgroup\$ – winny Sep 12 '16 at 18:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ is that 15A at 230V or what? \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 Sep 12 '16 at 18:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ @TonyStewart - Yes by combining a pair of 115VAC 15A outlets/branches that are phased locked but opposite phase, that makes a new 230VAC 15A capable outlet which I can then use to feed my 230VAC charger. It will not use the full 15A but rather less than half of that. It seems better to use a pair of 115VAC circuits at about 50% then to max a single one out close to 15A which is the normal limit of a standard outlet here in USA. I have seen max ratings of the outlets here at 1875 watts which they get my multiplying 125V by 15A. \$\endgroup\$ – David Sep 12 '16 at 19:05
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Generically, it is less stressful for a transformer designed for 50Hz to operate at 60Hz. You did not include any critical details, so it is not possible to offer any definitive answer to your question.

You did not mention the dramatic voltage difference, so we must assume that you are connecting your battery charger to a 230V circuit rather than the common 115V branch utility circuits common in North America.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I clarified this in my question and thanks for pointing out the missing details. - @RichardCrowley \$\endgroup\$ – David Sep 12 '16 at 18:22
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120Hz current pulses vs 100Hz current pulse will be about the same. if rectified voltage is same. Since current charge pulse duty cycle is same as % voltage ripple, and since f is increased 20% , sag time or ripple V is reduced and thus Ipk_charge/Iavg_discharge is your crest ratio, but ripple current in caps is rated for RMS so the Avg current is the same, the RMS current may be slightly higher. duty cycle* Ipk^2*ESR of caps (or using D.F. method) means caps may be slightly warmer at max load current. same for Diodes.

So bottom line, % ripple voltage is inverse to crest factor of cap current and ripple current and temp rise at full current. Verify self heating. If design margin is good and caps are not severely aged, Ok, otherwise replace caps with LOW ESR types and add passive power R to remove heat from caps.... depends on regulator if any and max charge current if adjustable.

But since the cap is your battery, charge current should not exceed battery rating.

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