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I am confused about the range of motion of a potentiomter with respect to its base (by base I mean the edge that lays flat on on the PCB when its mounted).

Assuming that the mechanical travel is 300 degrees, will the rangle of motion with respect to its base always be as shown in this sketch?? enter image description here

Basically, will the counter clockwise (CCW) position (i.e. start zero position in case of log taper) always be as shown in the image??

What adds to my confusion is this potentiometer datasheet -- http://www.mouser.com/ds/2/414/p260-12592.pdf On page 4, there is a section called "Shaft position" which shows different angles. Is this showing just the position of the notch/slot/flat edge when the pot is in full CCW position, while the "rotation" CCW starting position is still as shown in my sketch??

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  • \$\begingroup\$ It would be very helpful to explain WHY this seems important to you? Otherwise, it seems like a trivial and obvious issue that doesn't warrant asking the question. \$\endgroup\$ – Richard Crowley Dec 17 '16 at 14:43
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You can call ANY angle "start", and then another angle +300 degrees will be "end".

The diagram on page 4 of your data sheet shows where the flat is located at the "start" (0 degrees) position. Of course, for symmetrical shafts, your question makes no sense.

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enter image description here

Figure 1. The standard arrangement is to suit knobs with the grub screw 180 degrees around from the pointer.

The datasheet suggests that there are a variety of configurations available. These might allow flexibility in PCB design. Assuming that the knob should rotate from 7 o'clock through 12 to 5 o'clock in all applications then a different version would be required for a pot mounted hanging from a PCB to that mounted above a PCB. Many audio mixers will have PCBs running from front to rear of the panel. These would require pots at right angles to either of the above.

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