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To begin with i have an AMD Sapphire Radeon R9 270 and it worked fine for a year and a half.

I was doing some cleaning on my pc (cleaning the heatsinks and things like that) and when i connected everything back in place and proceded to turn the PC on; i got no display, i noticed it started smelling like melted solder, and when i looked inside my pc I saw the capacitor glowing red, then i shut the pc off and it now looks like this

enter image description here

I want know if you can help me find the exact one to buy in order to replace it

Thanks in advance

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closed as off-topic by brhans, The Photon, duskwuff, Daniel Grillo, Dave Tweed Oct 5 '16 at 13:40

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions on the repair of consumer electronics, appliances, or other devices must involve specific troubleshooting steps and demonstrate a good understanding of the underlying design of the device being repaired. See also: Is asking on how to fix a faulty circuit on topic?" – brhans, The Photon, duskwuff, Daniel Grillo, Dave Tweed
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ You need to find out what happened before you start replacing parts. Obviously the cap is toast, but it is possible that the fault lies elsewhere and simply replacing the cap may result in the same outcome. See if the manufacturer can help - perhaps it is a known failure mode? \$\endgroup\$ – Wossname Oct 4 '16 at 21:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ Take a picture of more of the board, we may be able to give you a better idea of what the capacitor range should be... Being larger then the rest I would bet it is a bulk decoupling capacitor on the order of 1uF. \$\endgroup\$ – MadHatter Oct 5 '16 at 1:38
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There is a chance, that capacitor C2641 is of the same kind as C2640 because especially for consumer grade designs it is common to simplify the bill of materials by reducing the count of different parts. If you feel lucky, you could desolder C2640 and measure its capacitance. No guarantee that they are indeed equal!
To be sure you would need a schematic or temporarily desolder C2641 from a working card. Both is unlikely to be achieved.

The package size of the capacitor can be identified with a caliper or by comparing to known parts.
From there take the highest voltage rating and best dielectric you can find in this package with the desired capacitance - assuming it is an multylayer ceramic capacitor MLCC.

Even if you manage to find an actually matching capacitor, there is a good chance that the error leading to the fried capacitor is somewhere else in the system.

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