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I am trying to run around 100 24v solenoids with a low amperage power supply. I originally thought when I began trying to run the solenoids I would go with a 100 amp power supply as each solenoid is about an amp. High 24v Power supplies are not only hard to come by but also usually very expensive and big.

Each solenoid is on frequently, never are they on at the same time, however I would like it to be possible to turn all on at the same time, in case me or anyone who is trying control my solenoids has full control over what they are doing and are not limited. I would say most of the time 70 of the solenoids are on. My question is, how low amperage power supply could I use? Thank you

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As an extension to peters answer, the total power required can be reduced if you get clever with powering your solenoids.

Typically you can get away with using full current to energise your solenoid, but can be reduced to a much lower holding current. (Application dependent)

Depending on how simultaneously you need all your solenoids to come on you could conceivably have a slight delay between turning each solenoid on so peak current draw is kept lower.

Of course this can only be implemented if you are controlling your solenoids through a device that would allow pulse width modulation on the solenoid. Luckily solenoids have a pretty high inductance and can generally be driven at a low frequency.

Sequencing

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If there is any possibility that all solenoids will be energized at the same time, then you must have a power supply capable of supplying the full power.

It may be desirable to split the load among several power supplies. You could, for example, use four 25 amp supplies, each providing power to a quarter of the solenoids.

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Since you will be using a lot of 24VDC solenoids, I think it's a large scale industrial machine. So you can use a 2.4kW transformer with diode bridge. Best option is to have three phase transformer with 6 diode rectifier, you don't need any capacitors for supplying solenoids, neither a stabilized power source. For the rest of your electronics use a 24V SMPS. Solenoids can also produce large spikes, so it is smart to use a separate PSU only for them.

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