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I have an amplifier kit, in which it requires a power supply with +24v -24v and ground, the input is and audio jack which is +v and ground , i.e. both of these grounds are connected, i would be using a laptop charger to test the circuit as it needs minimum 19v but the charger has a pin in which i believe there is a + and a ground or - I dont know how to connect the power supply to the circuit as the cirxuit has 3 inputs(+,-,ground) and my power supply has just 2 outputs(+,- or ground) Im pretty new to the +,-,and ground concept and i am confused if i need to connect the - to the ground or not This question is reposted from sound.stackexchange which was off-topic

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  • \$\begingroup\$ You must make all electrical connections. BTW, the question is off-topic here. \$\endgroup\$ – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 10 '16 at 9:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ I did not know where to post it. Sorry \$\endgroup\$ – Arnav Jain Oct 10 '16 at 9:28
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The word "ground" in an electrical circuit is always a relative term: in fact, it's the "reference" from which every other voltage is measured. *

So, if you have +24V, Gnd and -24V, that means that if you were to measure the voltage between -24V and +24V you would measure 48V. In fact, if you were to go through all of the documentation and add 24 to all of the voltages, you'd get exactly the same circuit, with 0V, 24V and 48V everywhere. That would make the novice happier - but confuse the professional no end! A usual audio signal rises and falls above and below some reference point (usually called "Ground"), so you'll get positive and negative voltages.

Your laptop power supply, that has 0V and 19V, fits inside the Gnd and +24V band. It doesn't work with the Gnd and -24V band at all. So you're going to need some kind of adapter or converter to get that to work.

* Note that some circuits distinguish between "analog" ground and "digital" ground. That just means that analog signals reference against one ground, while digital signals reference against a different ground. The two grounds, if you measure the voltage between them, may not have any difference at all - but that's not guaranteed, and connecting the two may introduce interference, especially digital intereference on analog signals.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks I was confused about it the whole time.A dding this as an answer \$\endgroup\$ – Arnav Jain Oct 10 '16 at 9:23

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