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If I say something like "SPDT switch" it's assumed to be a non-momentary switch. Is there standard nomenclature for unambiguously specifying a non-momentary switch?

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    \$\begingroup\$ I assume a switch is bistable unless stated otherwise (which can be done with the right schematic symbol). \$\endgroup\$ Commented Feb 7, 2012 at 19:06
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    \$\begingroup\$ Specify a vendor and part number? \$\endgroup\$
    – The Photon
    Commented Sep 20, 2012 at 18:54

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I've always assumed the opposite of "momentary" was "toggle". The wikipedia entry appears to confirm this:

The most familiar form of switch is a manually operated electromechanical device with one or more sets of electrical contacts, which are connected to external circuits. Each set of contacts can be in one of two states: either "closed" meaning the contacts are touching and electricity can flow between them, or "open", meaning the contacts are separated and the switch is nonconducting. The mechanism actuating the transition between these two states (open or closed) can be either a "toggle" (flip switch for continuous "on" or "off") or "momentary" (push-for "on" or push-for "off") type.

But a quick websearch seems to show that there are some switches sold as momentary toggles, so I'm not sure there is a completely unambiguous term.

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I believe the term I've heard used to describe this is "latching switch".

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  • \$\begingroup\$ +1 - I've had much more success searching (eBay, Element 14 etc) for 'latching' than for 'toggle'. In my mind toggle seems to refer to the design of switch. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Sep 22, 2013 at 15:44
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Maintained. Momentary means it releases as soon as your pressure is released and maintained switches maintain the positions.

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