0
\$\begingroup\$

This question already has an answer here:

After I learn about the DFF (Data Flip-Flop). I understand Flip-Flop as a device that can memorize input data at the rising or falling edge of the clock sequence.

But why call it flip-flop? Why not something like edge-triggered memory circuit. It's kind of a nick name which is hard to get for a non-English speaker. And in my country, the translated version is kind of twisted.

Could anyone explain the reason of the naming in plain English? Thanks.

\$\endgroup\$

marked as duplicate by pipe, Community Oct 13 '16 at 8:14

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ Terms enter the language because they're descriptive and concise. \$\endgroup\$ – Chu Oct 13 '16 at 7:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ @pipe That's a great post. So essentially, this name emphasizes the characteristic of the circuit that to be able to store/switch between 2 stable/opposite states. \$\endgroup\$ – smwikipedia Oct 13 '16 at 8:14
0
\$\begingroup\$

You know flip-flops? enter image description here

The actual "flip-flop" name is originated from the sound they made while walking (i.e. by slapping of the sole, foot and floor).

In electronics, a F/F has two "stable" states (0->1 or 1->0) and it alternates from one to another when one or more control signals (e.g. clock) is applied. Let's name it: flip as "0 to 1" and flop as "1 to 0".

\$\endgroup\$
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Oh really. So you don't think it's because it flips the state, like how you flip a page to the other side? \$\endgroup\$ – pipe Oct 13 '16 at 7:51

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.