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I want to connect a mobile processor such as a Samsung Exynos or Qualcomm Snapdragon, which both have their connectors on the bottom to a PCB but im not sure if this is something i can do on my own or needs a pick and place machine, to be honest im not entirely sure what the method of soldering used is called. Can you please inform me if a socket is available for these also? Sorry if this came across as a dumb question, thanks for the help :)

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    \$\begingroup\$ Then that's not trivial either, you'd need more than one layer and would need vias and decoupling caps, a real tough job even for a pro. You'd better set your sights a little lower! \$\endgroup\$ – Roger Rowland Oct 13 '16 at 12:32
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    \$\begingroup\$ Can you please inform me if a socket is available for these also? There probably are but since you have to ask I'm quite sure you cannot afford one. Such sockets are used for testing only not for using in a product. \$\endgroup\$ – Bimpelrekkie Oct 13 '16 at 12:32
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    \$\begingroup\$ Erm, you are trying to connect a several hundred pin processor which runs are several hundred MHz to a breadboard?? You really need to reanalyse your plans. \$\endgroup\$ – Tom Carpenter Oct 13 '16 at 12:32
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    \$\begingroup\$ I think you can safely forget about making mobile phone/ raspberry pi type complexity on a home-build system. This requires knowledge and experience only to be found in professional environments. Start with a simpler microcontroller based board without BGA packaged ICs. You'll have enough trouble with that in the beginning. \$\endgroup\$ – Bimpelrekkie Oct 13 '16 at 12:36
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    \$\begingroup\$ That's cute. Connecting a 1000 pin IC to a breadboard. I hope you have a large breadboard! \$\endgroup\$ – pipe Oct 13 '16 at 12:40
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It is not possible to solder components with contacts on the bottom (called Ball Grid Array, or BGA) using a soldering iron. You would need either a reflow oven, or a BGA rework station.

Some people do have reflow ovens at home, or have converted toaster ovens to do the job, but even then it's a bit tricky and easy to mess up.

So the answer to your question is yes, you can do this at home if you have the right tools, but if you only have a soldering iron then you can't.

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    \$\begingroup\$ To add to this, soldering companies use some sort of X Ray machine to verify the soldering quality which costs thousands of dollars. \$\endgroup\$ – Whiskeyjack Oct 13 '16 at 12:20
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You can do it dead bug style: enter image description here

Is it practical or is it going to work, especially in an 1000+ balls device?

I don't think so...

(Image from the comments area from Hackaday website)

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The... the horror! \$\endgroup\$ – Wossname Oct 14 '16 at 14:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ That hurts to look at \$\endgroup\$ – Scott Seidman Oct 14 '16 at 17:45
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I doubt it, the bottom of a mobile processor has a lot of pins that are too small for you to handle and would need a reflow oven.

Bottom of a CPU

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  • \$\begingroup\$ A reflow oven is pretty cheap. Lots of hobbyists have one in one form or another. \$\endgroup\$ – pipe Oct 13 '16 at 12:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes. It is called "heat gun", $30 or something. And lots of hobbysts can afford to make 10-12-16 layer boards with buried vias, to get proper wire fan-out for 1000+ pins, with 0201 bypass caps. Yes! \$\endgroup\$ – Ale..chenski Oct 13 '16 at 16:08
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    \$\begingroup\$ @AliChen: Getting the chip on there might be possible but if it doesn't work then you have practically no way to find out why, besides desoldering it again, but then how are you going to re-ball it at home? Totally impractical. \$\endgroup\$ – Wossname Oct 13 '16 at 16:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ Absolutely. Yield will reek to the point that any prototype will have zero testing value, so you may as well skip the step. \$\endgroup\$ – Scott Seidman Oct 14 '16 at 17:46

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