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If capacitors are connected in series, without a wire(direct connection between the terminals), what resistance will increase as more \$ C_N \$ are added?

Internal resistance? Or, the resistance of the metals terminals? Or both?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Resistances in series always increase. \$\endgroup\$ – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 29 '16 at 6:44
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    \$\begingroup\$ Wires are designed to have low resistance.You don't have to worry about it unless they are long,in practice.Adding capacitors in series increases total ESR (that's how it's called-Equivalent Series Resistance) but decreases total capacitance.The resistance of the terminals add up,to. \$\endgroup\$ – Daniel Tork Oct 29 '16 at 6:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ Also know that you're talking about DC resistance.Run an alternative current through the capacitors and you will have impedance produced by their reactance ,too.Search google for "capacitive reactance" for more information \$\endgroup\$ – Daniel Tork Oct 29 '16 at 6:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ If they are connected without a wire between the terminals, I think the resistance will be rather high. \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany Oct 29 '16 at 11:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ Are the terminal resistances considered load resistance/ internal as well? For computational analysis of the Pin, and P(dissipated). \$\endgroup\$ – Pupil Oct 29 '16 at 15:38
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The capacitors internal resistance is termed it's ESR (equivalent series resistance). The total will be the sum of all the capacitors. The lead resistance will also increase by the same factor but this is likely to be insignificant.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ as ERS increase, will it effect the output power(i.e voltage or current)? \$\endgroup\$ – Pupil Oct 29 '16 at 15:03
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    \$\begingroup\$ @XCIX I suppose the way to think of it is that for a given current an increase in ESR will increase the heat dissipated in the device but if your talking about devices in series the effect on each individually will be the same. \$\endgroup\$ – SpaceCadet Oct 29 '16 at 15:09

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