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I'm using a DC-DC boost converter in an electronics project. This boost converter requires an inductor. I plan on using this inductor with this boost converter chip.

I assume the answer will depend on the scenario (i.e. the chip being used, the inductance of the inductor, the current, etc.), however I'm trying to find a general method for determining the minimum distance I can place an inductor to nearby components. At what point would the magnetic field of the inductor start interfering with control chips?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ As close as TI's PSU design tool says you can. \$\endgroup\$ – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 30 '16 at 17:05
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    \$\begingroup\$ I have never heard that there is an issue of the magnetic field causing problems for IC's or transistors. The only thing you might have to worry about is placing multiple inductors close to each other in such a way that the magnetic field from one passes through the windings in the other. \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith Oct 30 '16 at 17:42
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    \$\begingroup\$ Probably not an issue, with obvious exceptions such as Hall chips or magnetometer chips. \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany Oct 30 '16 at 17:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ The path lengths inside the chip are very short, with very low self-inductances, at the frequencies at which your circuit is probably switching. \$\endgroup\$ – Rich S Oct 30 '16 at 19:13
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In general, there should be no problem placing the inductor as close as you want to other components, except perhaps other indctuctors or other magnetics. Many times people layout boost or buck circuits with the components too far away from the chip. It is best to follow the company's recommendations. In the case of this part, it is one page 21 of the datasheet:

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