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I'm working on a pcb design on eagle, which will be used to test some sensors. The design is made for three different sensors.

You connecet the sensor to the pcb, do the test and disconnect.

Here's one of them: enter image description here

All three sensors have different connectors, two of them use female headers, therefore i was able to find male headers the size i need. The other one uses lug fork terminals.

enter image description here

I need to connect the lug terminals to the pcb to be able to test the sensor. My question is; How could i do this? could i use a header? if so what type?

Thanks!!

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Spade Lug screw terminal blocks exist for PCB and chassis mount. and often used in appliances using high current. >1A \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart Sunnyskyguy EE75 Nov 15 '16 at 15:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ The answer is: With a fastener. Do a search on google for pcb and fastener \$\endgroup\$ – Voltage Spike Nov 15 '16 at 17:27
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You can use a PCB-mount screw connector such as this one from Keystone (photo courtesy of Digikey):

enter image description here

You will have to leave sufficient space between the connectors since there is nothing preventing the lug from rotating as there would be with a barrier terminal strip that others have suggested.

Be sure to pick the correct size for the lugs you want to use them with. They are available in M2.5/M3/M4/M5/6-32/8-32/10-32. Refer to the relevant datasheet for the recommended hole sizes.

You may also find this type useful if it is available in your desired size:

enter image description here

This kind is mounted right to the PCB so it requires more area, but it is made with an anti-rotation tab that engages the open end of your spade lug. Also by Keystone.

Here, from this ebay listing, is a typical application (HVAC PCB) of the second type (some other connections are male spade connectors soldered into the board).

enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ customer perception of appearance is a factor with this method, with exposed adjacent spade lugs manually screwed in final assembly or on site. \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart Sunnyskyguy EE75 Nov 16 '16 at 13:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ I will keep this option in consideration. Like you said it requires more PCB area, so i still have my doubts wheter to use this method or not. \$\endgroup\$ – ardv92 Nov 16 '16 at 15:07
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You could use a terminal block of the appropriate pitch to secure your lugs. Alternatively just add a hole for a screw with enough exposed copper around it to make contact. The latter option won't last for as many insertions as the terminal block, I would think.

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Use Images on any search engine for the correct keywords screw Terminal Block. They come in all sizes and shapes.

Then you must add to the library with schema and pads

What size are the lugs? http://www.ebay.com/itm/300V-30A-9-5mm-Pitch-4-Pin-Pluggable-Type-PCB-Screw-Terminal-Block-20Pcs-/321445165890?hash=item4ad79ffb42:g:lNcAAOSwRgJXjTYm

I would use compact terminal blocks for automated stripped fly-lead wire, to save cost, PCB space. improve appearance and risk of shorts with no final assembly tools required. (<=$0.10/contact)

enter image description here
http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/phoenix-contact/1990038/277-1797-ND/950925

Although quick disconnect has not been defined as a requirement yet.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Steward. I have been looking also for OP. I know they exist but not easy to find. I think he is looking for an open connector like the M426 and M429 but then for PCB mounting. I have not found them. Sometimes you see them as ground terminals on a pcb \$\endgroup\$ – Decapod Nov 15 '16 at 15:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for the reply, a terminal block could to the trick. this is the lug: conrad.nl/nl/… \$\endgroup\$ – ardv92 Nov 16 '16 at 9:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ what is the purpose of these connectors, High volume? or not or Tester for sensors? \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart Sunnyskyguy EE75 Nov 16 '16 at 14:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ The purpose of the connectors is to connect the sensor to the PCB for testing purposes. I made the terminal block you send in the first link in Eagle, thought it would do the job. The problem was that it has a pitch of 9.5mm, a little too big maybe. A compact terminal might be even better than a normal terminal block. Connecting and disconnecting would be easier. A quick disconnect is not required, but would be nice. \$\endgroup\$ – ardv92 Nov 16 '16 at 15:18
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enter image description here

For a Sensor Test Jig , I would rigidly secure Pomona Alligator clips to an external fixture and interface to board with std ribbon header with interlaced ground for reducing crosstalk and for ease of maintenance and connection to spade lugs with the best orientation for the operator.

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