3
\$\begingroup\$

I have recently found that someone can get a BS. in Electrical Engineering and a BS. in Electrical Engineering Technology. I'm trying to find the fundamental difference between the two, but the only thing I can find is that EE deals more with AC currents and power, while EET is more focused in device-controlling circuits. What are the fundamental differences between the two? are there an parts of EET that shouldn't be discussed on EE.SE?

\$\endgroup\$

closed as off-topic by Chris Stratton, laptop2d, ThreePhaseEel, Bence Kaulics, Dmitry Grigoryev Nov 18 '16 at 12:49

  • This question does not appear to be about electronics design within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ EET courses are usually offered at the Community College level (typically one and two year degrees, continuing education offerings, and transfer program offerings as a cheaper way of accessing a 4-year university later on.) EE requires 4-yr coursework, by comparison. Some EET courses are transferable to a 4-yr university as EE equivalents, with partnered universities. And some aren't. \$\endgroup\$ – jonk Nov 17 '16 at 18:09
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ One sits in front of a bench an solders stuff, one sits in front of a computer and designs stuff. \$\endgroup\$ – laptop2d Nov 17 '16 at 18:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ Based on similar nomenclature that I've seen with degrees in other disciplines (e.g. Computer Science vs. Computer Programming Technology), it sounds like the former - Electrical Engineering - is heavier on concept and theory while the latter - Electrical Engineering Technology - is heavier on practical application. Perhaps, for example, EE may involve more design work in CAD, while EET may involve more field work with multimeters. \$\endgroup\$ – Rocky Raccoon Nov 17 '16 at 20:18
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ The fact that they are both Bachelor programs seems to discount the typical community college angle to this. \$\endgroup\$ – Myles Nov 17 '16 at 21:46
  • 5
    \$\begingroup\$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this is about Engineering career and educational tracks rather than being a technical question about a specific problem within the practice of engineering as required by the scope of this site. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Nov 17 '16 at 21:58
6
\$\begingroup\$

My understanding is that engineering degrees are more theory based and engineering technology degrees are more application based. It isn't a complete distinction between theory and application since there is always some overlap but this was the main distinction when I attended ITT Technical institute's Electronics Engineering Technology program.

This is also one of the main differences cited by ABET which accredits some of these programs:

Engineering and engineering technology are separate but closely related professional areas that differ in:

Curricular Focus – Engineering programs often focus on theory and conceptual design, while engineering technology programs usually focus on application and implementation. Engineering programs typically require additional, higher-level mathematics, including multiple semesters of calculus and calculus-based theoretical science courses, while engineering technology programs typically focus on algebra, trigonometry, applied calculus, and other courses that are more practical than theoretical in nature.

Another area that can differ is career path.

EET questions are appropriate here. See this answer about how the name was chosen and the history of the site. Keep in mind that, there are some things that you may get better answers to in different places like physics.se or mathematics.se

\$\endgroup\$
3
\$\begingroup\$

Leaving the BA, BS or BE degree for what the are. The fundamental differences could be explained as follows:

The primary role of an electrical engineering technologist is to aid the electrical engineers with electrical power distribution, process control, and instrumentation design. Duties of this position include conducting statistical studies and analyzing costs of production for non-sustainable and sustainable designs. Electrical engineering technologists analyze the performance of assemblies and electrical components, as well as assist scientists and engineers with electrical engineering research. -- Payscale description of EET

Electrical engineers are responsible for implementing and designing components for any device that uses electricity, as well as the devices themselves. Engineers have to focus on the generation of power to the device or product. These devices can include anything that runs on electricity. Electrical engineers also focus on researching, creating, and improving products and devices. -- Payscale description of EE

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ So, it's like a doctor vs a surgeon to some extents? \$\endgroup\$ – tuskiomi Nov 17 '16 at 18:09
  • 6
    \$\begingroup\$ @tuskiomi, More like a nurse and a doctor. An Electrical Engineering Technology degree is meant to prepare you to be a technician who assists electrical engineers. A nurse or a technician require substantial education and are both respected careers, but a doctor or an engineer has substantially more responsibility (and get better pay). On the other hand, I know several technicians who used their experience and knowledge to get promoted to engineer, while the equivalent is not going to happen to a nurse without going back for a different degree. \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Nov 17 '16 at 19:35
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Taken from "the internet" is not acceptable attribution. \$\endgroup\$ – Ben Voigt Nov 17 '16 at 20:58
1
\$\begingroup\$

The "official" descriptions are essentially meaningless outside of academia. In the working world, there is little difference paid to it once you get out there and get experience. But a BIG difference in terms of your career path is that in many states, you cannot apply for an Electrical PE (Professional Engineer) license with just an EET degree, it must be an EE degree. In states where you can use another "lesser" degree, you typically need a lot more years of experience. That means if you want to work on your OWN as a licensed PE, you can't with an EET degree, you will have to work for someone else. I have a BS EET and discovered that after the fact. So I have to worked for someone else, I cannot be the principal of an engineering firm. Ultimately, that has had little effect on my 30+ years of a successful career and to be quite honest, I don't really want the stress of owning my own company any more (I owned a Systems Integration company for a number of years). Money is important, but it's not everything.

\$\endgroup\$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.