0
\$\begingroup\$

Where can I find information about the die surface for various ICs? I'm thinking about opamps in the first place.

The surface area is of course dependent on the features of the ICs (for opamps rail to rail, speed, noise) and on the max current they can handle. I think the process technology affects digital electronics, but not much analog circuitry.

So, where can I find the surface area for various common ICs and especially opamps?

This is out of curiosity, I don't have a need for any project.

\$\endgroup\$
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ What do you want to do with this information? It may be in the data sheet for "COB" / bare die package, where available. \$\endgroup\$ – pjc50 Nov 24 '16 at 17:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ I suspect that if you have a valid need to know, that information might be available from any of the integrated circuit manufactures and foundries which manufacture die. \$\endgroup\$ – EM Fields Nov 24 '16 at 17:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ @EMFields, no, no manufacturers will disclose their die area sizes, this is the most sensitive business information. The answer depends on the use. If it is about integration of many OPA into a chip, the answer is "very small". If it is a stand-alone OPA, it is defined by pads area. \$\endgroup\$ – Ale..chenski Nov 24 '16 at 17:59
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ @AliChen You can get any chip you want decapped for a nominal fee. You can do it yourself too, if handling hot nitric acid doesn't faze you. Here is an MSP430 \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany Nov 24 '16 at 18:18
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @AliChen I'm not the OP asking the question, nor do I know why they want to know. My guess is that die area is easy to find out (they don't bother on datasheets usually because it's unnecessary and has to be updated regularly) but yield is a closely held secret. \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany Nov 24 '16 at 18:35
2
\$\begingroup\$

Parts that are available as bare die, this information should be in the datasheet.

Some older parts included this information even if they weren't generally available as bare die, since it might be useful for estimating reliability of the part.

For example, here's the AD621 (actually an in-amp, not an op-amp, but it was the first PN I thought of):

enter image description here

So, that one is about 9.1 mm2. (I dunno how they screwed up the inch measurements so badly).

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

It really depends on the technology and the specification of the opamp and how you plan to use it. For exampe for the 741 you can find the following information.

enter image description here

In this case we have a complete opamp including pads. If you want use the opamp as part of a ciruit on an ASIC they are usually much smaller.

enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.