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I'm planning on testing three different circuits for their response to a power surge (in the event that a surge protector fails). They'll each be drawing 5V power from an AC to DC power supply and they're each different constant current laser diode drivers.

First, I'm going to try a few power supplies to see if there is any difference there and then move onto measuring how the circuits perform with surge-like transients on their 5V input.

In summary, I'm looking for suggestions on how to safely create a surge on a 220V 50 Hz line.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Are you looking for a short duration transient, or something more prolonged? \$\endgroup\$ – ThreePhaseEel Nov 28 '16 at 5:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm thinking a short duration transient \$\endgroup\$ – JNaik Nov 28 '16 at 8:03
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In summary, I'm looking for suggestions on how to safely create a surge on a 220V 50 Hz line.

Obviously, you're not looking at actually raising the voltage of the mains that connects to the utility company because (A) it's probably not legal and (B) a tremendous amount of power would be required to do this, as you have to satisfy increased current demand at the higher voltage for the entire grid.

So you want to jury-rig a diesel or gasoline generator to surge on demand. This is a tricky problem. Real power surges are due to lightning strikes and, to a lesser extent, power grid switching by the utility companies. Neither of these causes of surges can be scaled down to the hobbyist level.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for the reality check. Just out of curiosity, do you know how these on demand surges are created on a generator at an industrial level? \$\endgroup\$ – JNaik Nov 28 '16 at 8:09

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