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I guess these are capacitors... but I'm not sure. What are they exactly and how do I read their stripes?

enter image description here

The above picture gives the impression that the background is white paper, but it looks far from white, which obscures the colors of the parts. If the background is indeed white, then here is a fixed version. One of these two should be edited out once we know which one is the correct representation.

enter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ Clean your camera lens. The blooming around light areas is so bad that it's hard to identify the colors. Try to think about reflections and background too when you ask others to look at your pictures. \$\endgroup\$ Feb 27, 2012 at 19:07
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    \$\begingroup\$ @OlinLathrop He is improving though... His last question didn't even have a photo :-) \$\endgroup\$
    – Kellenjb
    Feb 27, 2012 at 19:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm ignoring your sarcasm... This is from a mobile phone camera in a dark room without flash light. \$\endgroup\$
    – bot47
    Feb 27, 2012 at 21:11
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    \$\begingroup\$ @OlinLathrop I think you need to ease up a bit on the picture quality requirements. There is no reason the picture needs to have completely perfect whites. I can read all of the colors on the first image just fine. In fact, I find the first image much easier to look at since the colors are slightly softer. \$\endgroup\$
    – Kellenjb
    Feb 28, 2012 at 13:26
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    \$\begingroup\$ Also, there is no reason we should ever be telling someone the specific values of all of those capacitors. This is not what the OP wanted at all. He wanted to know how to figure out the value, not have us give it to him. For this reason there really is no value in having perfect color. All we needed was the general idea of what the things looked like in order to confirm that they were capacitors, the very first image he posted was plenty good for this to be done. \$\endgroup\$
    – Kellenjb
    Feb 28, 2012 at 13:58

1 Answer 1

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They are film capacitors, typically ranging from a few nF up to a few uF. The colour code is similar to that for resistors, and read from the top.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Like this one? csgnetwork.com/capcccalc.html \$\endgroup\$
    – bot47
    Feb 27, 2012 at 21:19
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    \$\begingroup\$ Your DMM should be able to tell you the capacitance. \$\endgroup\$ Feb 27, 2012 at 21:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ Not all DMMs have capacitance modes. In fact very few do until you get into some of the higher end DMMs. \$\endgroup\$
    – Kellenjb
    Feb 27, 2012 at 22:28
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    \$\begingroup\$ BK2709B <== I have this $100 DMM. I guess I shouldn't assume I have the baseline functionality in my equipment. :) \$\endgroup\$ Feb 27, 2012 at 22:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ I wasn't trying to say that you can't get a DMM with capacitance measurement for cheap, rather I was just trying to say that it isn't typical. I would also bet many hobbyist would consider $100 for a DMM on the higher end of their price range. \$\endgroup\$
    – Kellenjb
    Feb 27, 2012 at 22:47

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