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So using a 6v 26 Ah battery and a 5v regulator, am I safe to hook it up to a 5v by 2.5 A max power draw device? I think so, I'm still get familiar with EE concepts though. What complications could arise? What is efficiency like on regulators, I know they heat up, so the must lose power.

[from the O.P.'s comment] The regulator in questions is MC7805.

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Traditional LINEAR regulators indeed drop power by heating up. Newer-technology SWITCHING regulators only draw power for fractional amounts of time so that they produce very low heat compared to the old-fashioned ones.

Note, however that many (most?) regulators need some better margin to work with. You will need a rather good (better than average) regulator to produce a 5V output from a 6V input voltage. Most 5V regulators you will find are not capable of operating on inputs as low as 6V. Now you MIGHT find a very "low-dropout voltage" regulator that can work with only 1 volt of differential.

There are also switch-mode regulators which can handle "drop-out" voltage down practically to zero (slightly more than 5V source for 5V output.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, it's safe. But no, a [venerable] 78XX linear regulator will not work for 6V input and 5V output. In the datasheet, notice "The input voltage must remain typically 2.0 V above the output voltage". So, look for a low dropout linear regulator (LDO). \$\endgroup\$ Dec 3 '16 at 3:28

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