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enter image description here I have plenty amount of capacitor with a strange symbol on them. I tried google but I could not decode those capacitors. that symbol looks chinese but like english alphabet "H". I need help

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    \$\begingroup\$ It looks like two numbers printed on top of each other. If you're desperate you could get one of these ebay.com/itm/… and measure its capacitance. For the same price as that component tester you could also buy a set of brand new capacitors. \$\endgroup\$ Dec 7 '16 at 12:26
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    \$\begingroup\$ @FakeMoustache I wonder how many identification questions your comment answers ;) \$\endgroup\$ Dec 7 '16 at 12:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ @DmitryGrigoryev pretty much all of them, aside the exactly one that comes up every day that asks to identify a cold war era soviet IC \$\endgroup\$ Dec 7 '16 at 14:04
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Judging by the size of the capacitor and the markings I'm willing to bet it's a 0.1uF, 100V capacitor. The K is a tolerance code designating +/-10%. I expect the funky character on the left is a manufacturer logo, probably from some Chinese factory.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Agreed. The manufacture's mark looks very like a dot superimposed over "け" -- the Japanese hiragana "ke": en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ke_(kana). I don't find anything similar in several search sites for Chinese characters. \$\endgroup\$ Dec 7 '16 at 21:10
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That's what we experts call an illegible misprint on a cheap, decades-old, replaceable for cents, capacitor.

Well, it's really something like

letter digit . 1 K

Now, correlating that with a table of [preffered numbers], the E24 series contains 1.10 and 5.10 as possible values, and the illegible digit is then either a 5 or a 1.

Throw these away. Buy new ones for when you need them. Components of this quality can literally be had for cents.

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    \$\begingroup\$ This doesn't explain the value. 5.1kF? Err... Also, suppose the OP is trying to repair something... sure he can throw the old cap away, but what to replace it with? \$\endgroup\$
    – Lundin
    Dec 7 '16 at 12:31
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Lundin problem is that we all agree it's a misprint. Now, if the guys producing this didn't care to fix the misprint, I don't even care enough to interpret what I can read – it might or might not have anything to do with the component we're looking at. Might have been the printing roller used for a heavy duty resistor on the same labeling machine just before someone started to push caps through it (and forgot to change the text, leading to mechanical problems leading to the misprint). \$\endgroup\$ Dec 7 '16 at 12:36
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Lundin Nothing says 5.1kF. The K is probably a tolerance code (+/- 10%). \$\endgroup\$
    – DerStrom8
    Dec 7 '16 at 12:42
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Agent_L Early capacitors used color codes, whether they were in stripe form or dot form. This was especially common during the WWII era. \$\endgroup\$
    – DerStrom8
    Dec 7 '16 at 14:08
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    \$\begingroup\$ @DerStrom8 is right; I was a bit confused when I opened my first tube radio. I could easily identify the electrolytic caps of the power supply, and the high-voltage paper film caps for their cubism, but I was confused why the HF parts didn't even contain any caps – until I realized not all components I considered to be resistors actually were. \$\endgroup\$ Dec 7 '16 at 14:16

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