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My project: I am trying to design a system for a school project that will help with electrical safety. My idea is a wireless electrical socket/outlet. It will use a transformer to convert 120v to 6v, and the 6v is sent through a coil, producing an electromagnetic field that transfers power to an identical coil on the other side.

My Question: What kind of coil would I need? The inductance? The wiring gauge? And finally, would I actually have to get the coil to be rated at 300 amps?

Diagram:

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

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    \$\begingroup\$ Where did the 300A figure come from? \$\endgroup\$ – vofa Dec 12 '16 at 17:13
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    \$\begingroup\$ Probably from the assumption that if the source outlet provides 15A at 120V, the out put should provide 300A at 6V.. \$\endgroup\$ – Eugene Sh. Dec 12 '16 at 17:20
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    \$\begingroup\$ not defined are the requirements for safety. e.g. double insulation to 3kV and output voltage at 300A or total power out plus any switches. Air coupling (wireless) will not possible with 300A at 50/60Hz Also project function is not defined. \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 Dec 12 '16 at 17:33
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    \$\begingroup\$ I'm guessing here that you'd need a couple of facing silicon steel cores about a meter square and weighing several tons to get decent coupling with a 300mm separation at 50/60Hz. \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany Dec 12 '16 at 17:58
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    \$\begingroup\$ Refer to the Qi wireless charging standard. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qi_%28standard%29 en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resonant_inductive_coupling \$\endgroup\$ – vofa Dec 12 '16 at 18:01
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schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

So do you know how to choose the correct wire gauge for primary and secondary for 120 turns around high permeability laminated steel to get 529 mH or 4.4 mH per turn?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This is basic schematic of a high power soldering gun, perhaps not what you had in mind. \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 Dec 12 '16 at 18:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ But it what was defined, rather poorly \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 Dec 13 '16 at 6:23

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