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I have a question about a special circuit symbol:

Unknown component: diode symbol with two lines going into the "triangle"

The component is a switch of a H-bridge. I checked a few symbol lists like here or here - but I can't find the right component. What is the meaning / component of this symbol?

This is the full schematic:

Full schematic using the unknown component

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closed as unclear what you're asking by The Photon, Leon Heller, Dmitry Grigoryev, Dave Tweed Dec 20 '16 at 1:45

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Some obscure thyristor/SCR/GTO? \$\endgroup\$ – winny Dec 19 '16 at 16:20
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    \$\begingroup\$ In other words, show us the symbol in the context in which you found it. \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Tweed Dec 19 '16 at 16:37
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    \$\begingroup\$ Does the circuit REALLY show that your four mystery components are connected ONLY at the top and bottom? What are those lines coming out the side? Are they really "floating"? Or are they connected to something? The best you can do here is gather random guesses since we are unable to see the CONTEXT. There are many symbols used in schematic diagrams that are not necessarily universally understood. But when viewed IN CONTEXT it is easy for most engineers to figure it out. But as an isolated case, it is practically impossible to say with any certainty. "Optical" typically uses ~~ lines. \$\endgroup\$ – Richard Crowley Dec 19 '16 at 19:44
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    \$\begingroup\$ Then, how can they be the switches of a H bridge? A component that acts as a switch needs a control input somewhere. Where is this control input? I only see the two poles of the switch in this symbol. \$\endgroup\$ – dim Dec 19 '16 at 19:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ can you show the gatedrive? I think it is a piss-poor GTO symbol but the gatedrive will confirm \$\endgroup\$ – JonRB Dec 19 '16 at 20:33
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It appears to be a non-standard block-diagram symbol for a uni-polar thyristor such as an SCR, etc. Absence of context makes any better answer impossible.

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