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This is a simple circuit i found on web. Please explain how it works as easy as possible. I want to know how transistor is generating the frequency in transmitter.

enter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ Inductive coupling. The same way a transformer works, just far less efficiently. \$\endgroup\$ – Tom Carpenter Dec 22 '16 at 16:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ Electromagnetic field and inductive coupling should be a good place to start to understand this circuit. \$\endgroup\$ – 12Lappie Dec 22 '16 at 16:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ -1 for not even bothering to rotate the picture properly. No, I'm not going to tilt my head sideways to spend my free time answering your question. Closing since without the picture, it's unclear what is being asked. Screw this \$\endgroup\$ – Olin Lathrop Dec 22 '16 at 17:16
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    \$\begingroup\$ @OlinLathrop whoa calm down. \$\endgroup\$ – arminb Dec 22 '16 at 17:51
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Oscillator

It's basically a circuit that generally falls under the umbrella "joule thief": -

enter image description here

The LED is not needed to make it oscillate just to demonstrate that an LED can be lit from a depleted 1.5 volt battery even though the LED needs about 2 volts to make it shine. In other words it extracts (or thieves) the last few joules of energy from a battery thus allowing an LED to shine for a longer.

So, in the absense of the LED it is still an oscillator.

Here's wikipedia's answer and there are literally hundreds of sites out there with the same explanation so. now you have the name you can choose the site that suits your level of understanding. Get googling!

Receiver

The magnetic energy created by the transmitting oscillator leaks out across space and can be received by another coil and a terminal voltage is produced. If the receive and transmit coils are close enough an LED can be lit.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ @user133933 if you are happy with this answer please consider formally accepting it or leave a comment if you need to know anything else. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Mar 1 '17 at 16:25
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The transmitter creates a moving (AC) magnetic field in the coil. The receiver pickups some of that magnetic field in its coil.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Can it be explained how does transistor generates moving magnetic field in the transmitter circuit?and how can i modify this to work on 9v input? \$\endgroup\$ – user133933 Dec 22 '16 at 16:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ The transistor and two coil windings form an OSCILLATOR which produces an alternating current ("AC"). Yes, it could be easily adapted for 9V. Probably start by increasing the number of turns in the transmitter coils. \$\endgroup\$ – Richard Crowley Dec 22 '16 at 16:55
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The wireless electricity acts like magnetic induction, similar a transformer that transfers electrical voltage across a condutor but they use alternating current (AC).

The transmitter have unidirectional flow of current, like a battery. For that reason, the circuit have a simple oscillator known for Hartley oscillator.

I hope I have helped your study.

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