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I've got a 12VDC input thats being used to create 5V to run a AVR and 8V to run 8DC motors. I need 10VAC as well to run some accessories. Basically they are just switches controlled with a solenoid. So the draw on the 10VAC will be minimal.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes you can. Look into inverters. \$\endgroup\$ – efox29 Jan 1 '17 at 2:27
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    \$\begingroup\$ (1) Have you opened one of these switches? What's inside of it? Are you sure that you need AC? If there is a rectifier, then there is a chance that DC could work. (2) Solenoids are current-controlled In my experience, "solenoid" usually doesn't spell "current draw will be minimal [as minimal comes]". Then again, it could be a very small solenoid. \$\endgroup\$ – Nick Alexeev Jan 1 '17 at 5:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ Pretty sure you could just use an H-bridge to drive it from 12V. By tweaking the high and low times you could approximate 10V of AC. As Jasen says in an answer. \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith Jan 1 '17 at 9:20
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It seems to me you could produce an approximation of 10V AC from your 12V input if you can drive an H-bridge with the right timings.

see "modified sine wave"

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It can be done. There are two divergent paths -- the first: If you have plenty of excess 12V capacity (more than a few amperes worth), you could simply buy a small inverter at an auto jobber, and power a garden variety Märklin compatible accessory transformer. This will be horribly inefficient, but requires no designing or construction.

The second, much more complex path, would be to design a custom inverter.

Something that would take 12V and regulate it down to 10V, and feed that into a transistor array called an "H-Bridge" to generate 10Vrms (more or less) AC.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Adding a separate inverter to pre-regulate the 12V down to 10V prior to the H-bridge seems like an un-necessary step. I built a 600W sine-wave generator and I just used a 40kHz PWM and an LC post filter to make a nice smooth sinewave of any amplitude less than the supply. \$\endgroup\$ – user4574 Jan 1 '17 at 3:49

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