0
\$\begingroup\$

I was just wondering how you would calculate the friction torque for a DC motor? and how the calculations would be different when finding the current, EMF, torque etc, when this is neglected.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Easiest way is to multiply the no-load current by the torque constant. \$\endgroup\$ – Brian Drummond Jan 19 '17 at 23:44
1
\$\begingroup\$

You don't calculate it, you measure it. It is a purely mechanical effect, depending on things like bearing quality (both intrinsic and due to aging), and aerodynamic effects. In general, motor frictional losses are ignored - if you have to take them into account you're working too close to the edge.

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm aware it would usually be ignored, unfortunately i have an exam next week where I need to understand how friction affects the calculations and how to calculate it \$\endgroup\$ – jackthompson Jan 19 '17 at 22:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ In that case it will be load friction. And it will be like any other torque. Find the friction force from the load, then multiply by the radius. \$\endgroup\$ – WhatRoughBeast Jan 20 '17 at 2:33
1
\$\begingroup\$

Well, you have static friction when the motor is stopped. When the motor starts turning you have dynamic friction. Since most parameters of the motor are measured, they include the friction.

All frictional coefficients are measured, there is not a good way to say this is A material with X surface roughness rubbing against B material with Y surface roughness and predict a frictional coefficient, it has to be measured.

If one really wanted to find the friction there is a way to calculate it from the values listed in tables, its messy and you would get an answer that is off from the real world value by some degree but it can be done. It would be better to measure it.

"Frictional resistance to the relative motion of two solid objects is usually proportional to the force which presses the surfaces together as well as the roughness of the surfaces. Since it is the force perpendicular or "normal" to the surfaces which affects the frictional resistance, this force is typically called the "normal force" and designated by N. The frictional resistance force may then be written"

So to find the frictional force in the motor (presumably the shaft), you would have to know the coefficient of friction between each material between the shaft and the motor and the normal force of the shaft on that material.

The bearing will come into play and create frictional torque around the shaft, to do that you will have to know the frictional coefficient of the bearing.

Measuring the friction of the shaft and bearing could be done by using a force or torque gauge and some knowledge of how to compute moments from force. Keep in mind the static friction will be different than when the motor is in motion (kinetic friction).

| improve this answer | |
\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.