1
\$\begingroup\$

We have selected a 100kohm potentiometer to dim LED's that are connected to a class 2 power supply. However, according to UL; all selected parts need to be UL recognized for the device to be UL approved. I can not find any information regarding whether certain potentiometers are UL recognized or not. The potentiometer that we have selected is P231-QC20BR100K but it can be any panel mounted 100K pot pretty much

I have a UL lookup where I can find a manufacturer and see if they have UL approved parts but it seems backwards and I have yet to find one that does.

Here is the UL SAM http://www.ul.com/global/documents/offerings/industries/lighting/Downloads/SAM.pdf

I know if I select parts out of the SAM then I am good to go, but I am looking for a more basic solution.

\$\endgroup\$
3
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ If something is certified by anything, they will proudly present it right away in the most visible places in their specs and docs. \$\endgroup\$
    – Eugene Sh.
    Jan 20 '17 at 21:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ Maybe not, sometimes the certificates aren't listed on the datasheet, usually they'll have them on their website or datasheet though. \$\endgroup\$
    – Voltage Spike
    Jan 20 '17 at 21:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ The power supply to be used is this meanwellusa.com/productPdf.aspx?i=256 and shows a 100Kohm pot used to dim the circuit. \$\endgroup\$ Jan 23 '17 at 17:05
2
\$\begingroup\$

Not every component needs to be recognized. The power supply as a whole will be listed / recognized. It's up to the evaluation to the appropriate standard to determine if the component is critical. Potentiometers are not usually recognized unless they have switches or are needed to seal out water and dust etc.

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

I contacted a mean well engineer for this issue and his response was

"The potentiometer does not require to have UL cert because the PWM-60-12 CofA does not require. "

Datasheet - http://www.meanwell.com/productPdf.aspx?i=256

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ +1 for getting a responce! CofA is UL shorthand for "Conditions of Acceptability". Theses are special notes or instructions on how to use the device per UL requirements. They don't have to tell you what they are (but it is very useful to know!). These CofA's will be used when the final product is being evaluated. An example would be a psu that only works within it's temperature range if mounted vertically other wise it overheats(convection air cooling). This means if you mounted it horizontally in the end product it would need looking at again and possibly could not be used. \$\endgroup\$
    – Spoon
    Jan 23 '17 at 22:39
0
\$\begingroup\$
  1. look at the part for the UL mark;
  2. call the oem;
  3. check out the datasheet;
  4. call UL?
  5. submit it a UL certification yourself. ...
\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

You can go to UL.com and get to their on-line certifications directory then type in the name of the manufacturer to see which (if any) of their components are UL listed or recognized. If they are not on there, they are not.

UL listing or recognition stipulates that the UL mark must be on the product or data sheet. As said, if a manufacturer goes to the trouble and considerable expense to do so, they are going to make it obvious.

That said, if you are connecting to the load side of a class 2 power supply, you may not need to use UL listed or Recognized components. Have you talked to UL about this?

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.