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Can a cheap voltage regulator (DC to DC Buck Converter Step Down) blow up when I connect/disconnect a pretty big inductor (about 9000 turns) or is it self-protected?

I am asking because it makes a pretty big flame when I connect the inductor to the power supply (15V).

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    \$\begingroup\$ If the seller can't answer that or provide proper data which answers that ... buy from one who can. \$\endgroup\$ – Brian Drummond Jan 27 '17 at 13:56
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To be on the safe side, you should add a flyback diode parallel to the electromagnet. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flyback_diode

Make sure you use a diode rated for (more than) the maximum current that will flow through the inductor.

The maximum current, in Amperes, used by that inductor will be 15V/R where R is the series resistance.

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The voltage regulator u talk about has short circuit protection. Usually inductors are fed alternative not continuous voltage. What are you trying to do?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ "What are you trying to do?" - a magnet :) \$\endgroup\$ – Ultralisk Jan 27 '17 at 17:56
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    \$\begingroup\$ They have short-circuit protection indeed but I probably need anti-reverse polarity protection :) \$\endgroup\$ – Ultralisk Jan 27 '17 at 17:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ For a magnet you have to compute the current you need and get a proper power supply. The anti-reverse polarity can be solved with a diode if needed. \$\endgroup\$ – user114883 Jan 28 '17 at 19:20

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