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Could someone tell me the technical name of this connector?

Visual description:

  • ~2 mm thick (for one row)
  • 6 ~ 8 mm long
  • ~ 2 mm wide for each pin (e.g. 4 mm for 2 pins)
  • usually black housing

It may have 1, 2, 3 or more pins. Is there an upper limit?

A photo of the connector

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    \$\begingroup\$ I suggest to crop the picture to a reasonable size \$\endgroup\$ – Jonas Stein Jan 29 '17 at 15:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ the "2mm wide" will absolutely be based on the raster unit 2.54 mm \$\endgroup\$ – dlatikay Jan 29 '17 at 20:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ tl;dr BLS/Dupont - indeed, in 2.54 raster; see electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/131253/… google "dupont connector" or "BLS connector" to see for yourself. Upper limit seem to be at about 40 for on-cable males/females (aliexpress.com/w/wholesale-dupont-40.html), with the upper limit to a single casing being around 40 pins as well, and essentially without limit for PCB males - since you can just solder a couple of them in line if you need. OTOH, there's also BLD, though they are usually 2x20 top. \$\endgroup\$ – vaxquis Jan 29 '17 at 20:40
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Different manufacturers have different names for them. It's a housing, into which contacts crimped on the wires are inserted (they snap in).

Digikey uses this description:

n Position Rectangular Housing Connector Receptacle Black 0.100" (2.54mm)

where n is the number of positions and 0.1"/2.54mm is the pitch.

The largest I see in stock (single row) is an Amphenol 36 position one. If you need more you can stack multiple connectors but that leaves things open to more incorrect ways to plug them in.

Since the manufacturer has to manufacture an injection mold cavity for each size, the limit for a single-piece molding will be determined by their profitability calculus.

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That's a female pin header connector.

There's probably no real upper limit for their size, just usability.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ upper limit: don't know for the females, but we used to buy the "male" solder-in connectors in strips of 50, and cut them as needed for small series. \$\endgroup\$ – dlatikay Jan 29 '17 at 20:36
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As others have stated there are a lot of different names for such type connectors from various manufacturers.

There is however a somewhat generic term that has come into play for this type connector and wiring in the last few years. Often referred to as Dupont jumper wire cables, "Dupont" connector housings or "Dupont" crimp pins etc.

Search for this term on sites like eBay and Amazon and you will see what I refer to.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ But you likely won't find anything on manufacturer or franchised distributor sites using that term (except maybe references to plastic resin). Seems to be a hobbyist term. \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany Jan 29 '17 at 12:11
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    \$\begingroup\$ In my industry they tended to be called 'Berg' connectors, after another manufacturer \$\endgroup\$ – Neil_UK Jan 29 '17 at 12:15
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Neil_UK We called them Molex KK connectors after the dominant (US-based) manufacturer of the time. \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany Jan 29 '17 at 12:27
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    \$\begingroup\$ We just call them "jumper cables/wires" here in India \$\endgroup\$ – rahuldottech Jan 29 '17 at 15:17

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