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I want to know, is there a way to make a tungsten lightbulbs filament withstand a mass amount of thermal shock while still producing a vast amount of heat?

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Buy a "rough service halogen" bulb and leave it intact.

Rough service halogen bulb

Done, from the factory. Hot as the hinges of heck. Often used as fast turn on heaters, in fact.

Now, if you want to make it last longer, give it a "soft start."

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I assume you mean mechanical shock as filaments see some pretty severe thermal shock as they heat up.

Make the filament thicker (lower voltage), run it at a lower temperature, add better and more supports. The latter two things will decrease the efficiency of the bulb, which is why the old 'rough service' incandescent bulbs produced fewer lumens per watt than similar regular incandescent bulbs. From here:

enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Question: let's say I am using the vast heat from a tungsten filament to heat something else up, but the problem is it will cause a vast amount of pressure and Will be shut of multiple times very rapidly. Is there ANY way I can make the filament handle such an environment? \$\endgroup\$ – DeusIIXII Jan 30 '17 at 0:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ "Vast amount of pressure"? Huh? Could you explain that in more detail? Or have you removed the filament from a light bulb and are trying to use it to heart something? (If so, that just won't work for long - the tungsten will oxidize and fail rapidly.) Plus, of course a 100 watt bulb will only produce 100 watts of heat, so why "vast heat"? \$\endgroup\$ – WhatRoughBeast Jan 30 '17 at 0:59
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    \$\begingroup\$ I believe, though don't have good proof, that using a dimmer to turn it on slowly (say over a second) will greatly reduce the turnon shock and extend the life. \$\endgroup\$ – DoxyLover Jan 30 '17 at 1:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ As @WhatRoughBeast says, the problem will likely be that the environment is too reactive at temperature so the element rapidly oxidizes and turns into white powder. \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany Jan 30 '17 at 1:12
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    \$\begingroup\$ @DeusIIXII - 300 to 1500 psi of what? Flourine? Hydrogen? Oxygen? And trust me, coating an incandescent tungsten wire with nickel and aluminum will simply add fuel to the fire. Why don't you do us all a favor and explain in some detail what you're trying to do? So far nothing you say makes much sense, and the more disconnected details you give the less sense you make. \$\endgroup\$ – WhatRoughBeast Jan 30 '17 at 5:27

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