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I have one simple question: can I use a LED power supply for a general purpose, e.g., to supply some logical controllers etc. Are there any limitations of a LED power supply that I'm not aware of?

For example, I would like to buy this power supply to supply a PLC.

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That looks to me like a standard, general purpose DC power supply, so it should be fine for your purpose.

There are some power supplies designed specifically for use with LEDs that have a constant current output - the voltage automatically varies over some range to keep the current through the LEDs constant - that type of supply would not be suitable for other applications.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I was afraid that this one (from the question post) works in a constant current mode (CCM), and since it doesn't have any detailed technical documentation, I can't tell how it works. So LED power supplies in general don't work in CCM, but in a constant voltage mode (CVM)? \$\endgroup\$ – Marko Gulin Feb 1 '17 at 20:46
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    \$\begingroup\$ @MarkoGulin Please use CC and CV for constant current and constant voltage since CCM is already "reserved" for continuous conduction more. \$\endgroup\$ – winny Feb 1 '17 at 20:59
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    \$\begingroup\$ "Normal" power supplies are Constant Voltage, unless otherwise stated. "LED" supplies may be either constant voltage or constant current, depending on application. The specs for a contant-current supply might be "24 - 36 Volts, 300 mA". The supply you suggest is spec'd as "24 Volts, 4.2 Amp" so should be constant voltage. I expect it is called a "LED Supply" only because the seller sells LED lighting equipment. Other sellers would just call it a 24 Volt power supply. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Bennett Feb 1 '17 at 21:12
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As long as the output voltage and current match, you should be good to go.

Something to keep in mind, especially with cheap power supplies, is the output ripple and regulation can be quite severe. The power supply might say it's 24V, but due to poor design, the actual output is only 22V. Or the voltage might droop by a few volts.

At the end of a day, a power supply is a power supply.

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Usually LED power supply is called one that keeps a specific amperage constant by varying it's voltage, which is probably something you don't want.

If you can't find it's data-sheet, then you should get a normal power supply.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The URL provided by OP shows that he is not referring to a CC PSU. \$\endgroup\$ – Wesley Lee Feb 1 '17 at 20:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ It does not referring to a CV PSU either. \$\endgroup\$ – SkarmoutsosV Feb 1 '17 at 21:06
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    \$\begingroup\$ That supply is described as "24 Volt", implying it is CV. A CC supply would specify a voltage range. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Bennett Feb 1 '17 at 21:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ The accepted answer and at the above comments are well expressed but it's a matter of personal practice to avoid assumptions and trust datasheets. \$\endgroup\$ – SkarmoutsosV Feb 4 '17 at 23:13

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