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I have one of these devices: enter image description here

To control 4 rgb leds on a pool. I googled some sites that show this exact device and it seems to work with the 433Mhz frequency (I bought a box that included the power supply, leds, etc, everything connected so I assume this is the frequency it uses since the device and remote looks exactly the same as the one I have).

My problem is that the receiver box is located inside a room made of bricks where the pool pump and filter are, next to one of the pool walls (which is made of concrete and iron rods). So the remote will only work if I get REALLY close, and that is if the batteries are new.

The antenna on this device seems to be just a small wire. I did some googling and found that there are some 433Mhz antennas that look a little better, like similar to wifi antennas, I think I even have one from an old cctv system.

My question is, if I wanted to use a better antenna (maybe extend it since I saw some 433Mhz antennas that comes with like a 3mts cable, so its placed outside the pump/filter room, or just leave it inside if the antenna is good enough to work), can I just connect it to the existing wire that is currently acting as antenna? Or should I open the device and solder the new antenna to the pcb?

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Don't connect the external antenna to the existing antenna wire. Antennas are designed for a specific frequency, and changing the dimensions by adding more wire or a cable will probably make the performance worse, not better. You may be able to connect to the PCB pad (after unsoldering the original antenna), but this depends on the circuit design. There may be impedance-matching components on the board that are optimized for that original antenna. It's impossible to say for sure without seeing the board and schematic.

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