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Hello I'm trying to understand a concept here: if I have a coil wound around a tube, with liquid flowing through the tube, will the electrical flux generated by the coil be enough to perform electrolysis?

My apologies for the original format.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by jonk, PlasmaHH, Andy aka, Leon Heller, Neil_UK Feb 6 '17 at 14:55

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ If your reaction is activated by magnetic fields then yes. Inductors generate magnetic fields. \$\endgroup\$ – Voltage Spike Feb 6 '17 at 17:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you, do you mind explaining what you mean by activated? \$\endgroup\$ – Territory Man Feb 6 '17 at 17:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ The energy needed to initiate a reaction. \$\endgroup\$ – Voltage Spike Feb 6 '17 at 17:39
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(sorry, too long for a comment)

You are juggling terms around assuming they mean something in the context they happend to land in.

If I have a coil on an AC or DC circuit acting as an inductor. 

A coil is an inductor, so what do you mean by acting?

And AC or DC will make a big difference lateron, so make up your mind.

Inducing a voltage of say x.

'Inducing a voltage' is a weird concept when the coil is driven by a source.

If I put a liquid substance inside the coil with a resistance of say y,

What do you mean by 'resistance'? The inverse of magnetic permeability?

will that produce a current of z in the substance if I divide the induced voltage by the resistance of the substance?. 

Now you are realy off to fairyland. You seem to divide the magnetic field strength by a resistance to get a current.

Note that a static magnetic field (remember: choose AC or DC) will never induce voltage or current in something that is static (= non-moving).

(I understand, to derive resistance you must calculate from resistivity). 

That doesn't make any sense to me.

Thank you for taking the time to read the question.

Thanks. I'm off to get an asperin against the induced headache.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Ha. My apologies, but thank you for taking the time. \$\endgroup\$ – Territory Man Feb 6 '17 at 17:06

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