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I was thinking about the concept of negative voltage when I came across this question. I understand that negative voltage means voltage below a certain threshold, say ground. So, can we use simple voltage division to produce even more negative voltages from an already generated negative voltage?

Forgive me if I'm off target here.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ You need a boost convertor for negative voltages. Simple voltage division will give you less negative voltages, i.e. closer to 0. \$\endgroup\$ – Brian Drummond Feb 10 '17 at 12:21
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    \$\begingroup\$ You have two points. You can generate any voltage between those two points with a divider. But you cannot use a divider to get outside the range of those two points. \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith Feb 10 '17 at 17:06
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Think about the positive voltage scenario - you can convert a more positive voltage to a less positive voltage using a voltage divider and the same applies to negative voltages - the bigger negative voltage at the input becomes a smaller negative voltage at the output.

If you want a bigger voltage in magnitude for a smaller input voltage, then you need to use an active circuit that involves energy storage such as in a boost converter.

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can we use simple voltage division to produce even more negative voltages from an already generated negative voltage?

No. a voltage divider basically provides you with the average of two voltage sources. So it needs a more negative voltage source to produce a less negative voltage source.

an oscillator (plus a rectifier) will do what you want. many dc/dc converters (essentially an oscillator + a rectifier) can be configured to provide negative output.

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